Attorney who questioned Trump reveals what Mueller should be ready for: 'His emotions got the best of him'
Donald Trump (AFP / Jim WATSON)

If special counsel Robert Mueller wants to know what it would be like to question Donald Trump for a deposition, he should look no further than Glenn Zeitz, who did it in the 1990s.


In an interview with CNN, the lawyer warned that the president could let his emotions get the best of him, slowly bubbling up until it explodes. At one point, Trump even began attacking the attorney, and his reputation, much like Americans are seeing the Trump team has attacked Michael Avenatti.

"He was like a pot that started off and then simmered and then the pot was boiling and boiling," said Zeitz. "Then we got towards the tail end of the deposition. That's when the pot boiled over."

The attorney said that that was when Trump started calling him a "third-rate lawyer." Zeitz explained that he thought he was doing a "pretty good" job because he finally "had gotten to him' after almost two hours of questioning.

"Donald was 'The Donald' that you see now," he described. "He walks in. He wants to take over and make the deposition his deposition even though it is mine. He tries to control the questioning."

He described the answers as "nonresponsive," where Trump would "add things on" or "make self-serving statements" that didn't make any sense within the context of the question.

"If I ask Donald a question, 'What time is it?' He would probably tell me how to build a clock," the lawyer explained.

He had one observation that should spell disaster for the Trump legal team, however.

"He was grossly unprepared, or he was just deliberately being evasive," Zeitz said. "What he was doing at least in the deposition was saying that he delegates everything to everybody else."

That observation matches Trump in other places in his life. The president received a 100-page briefing book on Russian President Vladimir Putin that he didn't read before going into their one-on-one meeting. He also skipped the brefing after the meeting.

Watch the full interview below: