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‘There is no happy ending’: Morning Joe says Trump and Rudy have gone ‘through the looking glass’

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MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough and Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Jon Meacham agreed the increasingly frantic comments by the president and his lawyer betrayed their deepening anxiety over the direction of the special counsel probe.

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President Donald Trump kept up his Twitter attacks on the media and law enforcement officials over the weekend, and attorney Rudy Giuliani memorably insisted “truth isn’t truth” as he defended his client on television.

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“We’re through the looking glass,” Meacham said. “Giuliani isn’t doing anything that he doesn’t think Trump wants him to do. You can hear Donald Trump saying it.”

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Meacham was struck by the president comparing his own White House counsel to Richard Nixon’s whistleblowing White House counsel, John Dean, who Trump called a “rat.”

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“Where you have the old image of Nixon talking to the portraits, I see Trump talking to mirrors and Rudy,” Meacham said. “You know, he’s just wandering around talking to himself and creating this.”

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He compared the president’s attempts at obfuscation to the “debate” over climate change.

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“It’s extreme weather,” Meacham said. “The press, broadly put, (special counsel) Mueller, the facts say X. They are going to say Y and take their chances that the right number of folks and the right number of electoral states agree with them.”

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The historian said Trump and Giuliani weren’t even trying to disguise their efforts, but he doubted they would be ultimately successful in confusing the public.

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“It’s not even an attempt at this point, but the assumption that you simply can fool enough of the people enough of the time to maintain this temporal hold on power, and it’s a cynical exercise from the very top,” Meacham said.

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“It starts with Trump,” he continued. “It radiates to a couple of these other, forgive me, New York tabloid figures, and because of an underlying anxiety in the country, it has worked nationally, or at least deeply enough certainly that we’re going to have to deal with it. It’s why the midterms will tell us so much. History is not going to reward Mayor Rudy Giuliani for the way he spent his Sundays in 2017 and 2018.”

Scarborough said the strategy wouldn’t work, and he said the president could not survive politically.

“Just look at political history,” Scarborough said. “He’s a 40-percent president. Presidents with 40 percent approval ratings, my gosh, with re-elects in the low 30s and the very states that put him over the top in 2016, their parties don’t win midterm elections and they don’t get re-elected. There is no happy ending for the Trump administration, especially as they pile one lie on top of another lie on top of another lie.”


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New Orleans funk icon and co-founder of the Neville Brothers Art Neville dies at 81

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Art Neville, a New Orleans funk legend and co-founder of the Neville Brothers, has died, his brother said Monday. He was 81 years old.

The singer and keyboard player who answered to the sobriquet "Poppa Funk" was well known as the voice of the "Mardi Gras Mambo," which quickly became a mainstay of his home city's famed carnival after he first played it at age 17.

"Artie Poppa Funk Neville you are loved dearly by every one who knew you. Love always your lil' big brother AARON (we ask for privacy during this time of mourning)," his brother, soul singer Aaron Neville, tweeted.

His death follows that of another famed New Orleans musician, the blues pianist Dr. John, who died last month.

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Native Hawaiians continue protest a week after telescope construction was set to start on sacred lan

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Indigenous protectors of Mauna Kea oppose the $1.4 billion project

A week after construction was scheduled to resume on a long-delayed $1.4 billion telescope at the summit of Mauna Kea—a dormant volcano on Hawaii's Big Island—thousands of Native Hawaiians who consider the mountain sacred continued to protest the planned observatory.

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Gun ownership increases homicides — but only a very specific kind of them: study

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Does the frequency of gun ownership impact the homicide rate? In the broad sense, many studies have shown it does. But how does it do so exactly?

A new study, conducted at the University of Indianapolis and published in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine, offers a profound hint. The study, which examined homicide rates by state from 1990 to 2016, suggests that most forms of homicide — those committed against friends, acquaintances, and strangers — are negligibly affected by firearm ownership rates. But one particular category of homicide is sharply correlated with the presence of guns: domestic violence.

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