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Former prosecutor nails how Flynn learned that ‘federal court isn’t Twitter or cable news’

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A formal federal prosecutor pointed out that on Tuesday, former Trump advisor Michael Flynn learned the hard way that federal court is nothing like his former boss’ favorite entertainment arenas.

“Flynn on Tuesday got an unpleasant lesson on the difference between politically effective arguments and legally astute ones,” Ken White, an ex-prosecutor and lawyer who writes at the Popehat blog noted in The Atlantic.

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When Flynn went to court earlier in the day, he was “backed by an array of well-wishers including President Trump, and buoyed by widespread conservative arguments that the FBI had violated his rights” — and expected to receive little-to-no sentencing upon the suggestion of special counsel Robert Mueller.

“Instead,” White wrote, “he was threatened with jail by a furious United States District Judge Emmet Sullivan, who accused him of selling America out and forced him to retreat from his evasions.”

The former national security adviser’s lawyers “hastily agreed” to delay his sentencing until March 2019 so he could further cooperate with Mueller’s investigators “and perhaps work off the custodial sentence that Sullivan was clearly contemplating,” the ex-prosecutor noted.

This turn of events, while potentially shocking to Flynn, “was predictable to everyone who understands that federal court is neither Twitter nor a cable news show.”

Until Tuesday, White suggested, Flynn had a sweetheart deal — a recommendation from both Mueller and his prosecutor of probation due to him being “first in the door” to cooperate with the special counsel and offering testimony that was “particularly valuable.”

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“Every defendant’s ideal sentence was his to lose,” the attorney wrote. “And he lost it. He now has until March to win it back.”

Read White’s entire analysis via The Atlantic.

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Giuliani associates’ company promised to build a bizarre temple over Jerusalem

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The Wall Street Journal has uncovered new details about the strange work done by Fraud Guarantee, the company founded by Lev Parnas, the indicted henchman of Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani.

Specifically, the Journal was given information from an investor who says he plugged $250,000 into Fraud Guarantee after Parnas told him that he could use his connections with President Donald Trump to help promote his initiative to create peace in the Middle East.

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2020 Election

Liberal PACs gear up for major ad blitz to flip GOP-controlled legislatures in states where Trump is vulnerable

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According to a report from Politico, two left-leaning PAC's are working in concert to flip GOP-majority legislatures in reliably conservative or too- close-to-call states.

With Donald Trump expected to be at the top of the Republican ticket, "Arena and Future Now Fund, are planning to spend $7 million to try to flip GOP-controlled state legislatures in Florida, Arizona, Michigan and North Carolina," the report states.

According to Daniel Squadron, co-founder of the Future Now Fund, "If you look at where the important states are, the places most people are watching are the Electoral College to secure the White House. But the truth is that when you talk about the impact of 2020, electoral control of the state legislatures is critical.”

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Newly revealed letter details Rudy Giuliani’s work for Fraud Guarantee company owned by indicted henchman

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A newly revealed letter sheds light on Rudy Giuliani's work for Fraud Guarantee, a company founded by his indicted associates Lev Parnas and David Correia -- and the document has been handed over to investigators.

Fraud Guarantee circulated an investor letter last year that shows the company would pay the consulting firm Giuliani Partners up to $2 million for the first year and give the former New York City mayor equity in the company, reported the Wall Street Journal.

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