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Judge agrees to postpone sentencing for Michael Flynn after unleashing a furious rebuke on him in court

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President Donald Trump’s first national security adviser, Michael Flynn, asked a federal judge to delay sentencing for lying to FBI agents about his contacts with Russia.

The retired U.S. Army lieutenant general pleaded guilty to lying to investigators in January 2017 about his contacts with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak during the presidential transition, and the judge blasted Flynn in court during his sentencing hearing.

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“You were an unregistered agent of a foreign country while serving as the National Security Adviser to the president,” said Judge Emmet Sullivan. “Arguably, this undermines everything this flag over here stands for. Arguably, you sold your country out.”

However, Sullivan walked back those statements after a half-hour recess requested by Flynn, saying his contact with foreign agents took place before he was in the White House and clarified another remark.

“I’m not suggesting he committed treason,” Sullivan said, after asking prosecutors if they had considered that charge. “Don’t read too much into the questions I asked.”

After the recess, defense attorneys changed course and said they would take up Sullivan on his repeated offers to delay the sentencing.

The judge set a status hearing for March 13.

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Flynn had agreed to cooperate with special counsel Robert Mueller, who said in sentencing documents that Flynn had provided “substantial” assistance to the investigation and at least two others, but he has since claimed the FBI tricked him into making misleading statements.

Trump, in a Tuesday morning tweet, appeared to encourage his close campaign aide to stick with those claims, which have been amplified by White House officials and the president’s personal lawyers, during the sentencing hearing.

But his attorneys told the judge that Flynn did not believe he was trapped into lying and accepted full responsibility for his actions, and they did not wish to delay the sentencing hearing.

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However, they changed their mind after Sullivan unloaded on Flynn, who offered to provide additional testimony to prosecutors in exchange for a lighter sentence.

Flynn has already met with investigators 19 times, according to prosecutors, and has also admitted to lying about his undisclosed lobbying for Turkey’s government and other research work.

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He resigned from the White House in February 2017, after serving just 24 days.


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‘Moscow Mitch’ blunder means Donald Trump can never be vindicated: Harvard Law’s Laurence Tribe

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Constitutional law expert Laurence Tribe blasted Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) for violating a legal principle that has existed for over 1,000 -- and his move means that President Donald Trump can never be vindicated during impeachment.

Tribe, who has taught at Harvard Law School for 50 years and argued 36 cases before the United States Supreme Court, has been advising Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Democrats during the impeachment inquiry. He was interviewed on Friday by MSNBC chief legal correspondent Ari Melber.

Tribe said, "what it looks like is that the majority leader is going to conduct this trial as though he's a member of the defense team," Tribe said. "You know, it's an ancient principle, centuries-old -- actually over a millennium old -- that you can't be a judge on your own case and effectively, to allow Donald Trump to call the shots, violates that principle."

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Democrats ‘are being more republican than Republicans’ in Judiciary Committee memo: Post columnist

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A Washington Post editorial is singing the praises of the Judiciary Committee's memo about the impeachment charges President Donald Trump is facing. The memo, titled “Constitutional Grounds for Presidential Impeachment” details the fundamental principles of the Constitution the founders outlined to guarantee the country wouldn't fall at the hands of corruption.

"The memo is remarkably originalist. Regardless of what happens with the impeachment, we are getting a much-needed civics lesson," The Post explained.

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Victim of Stephen Miller policy was murdered and dismembered — his body was found in 2 suitcases

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Controversial White House advisor Stephen Miller has pushed President Donald Trump to enact harsh immigration policies, which are getting more attention after a grisly murder.

"A 35-year-old man from El Salvador returned to Mexico under a controversial Trump administration program was brutally murdered in Tijuana while waiting for an outcome to his U.S. asylum case, according to his family’s attorney,'" The Sand Diego Union-Tribune reported Friday. "During a seven-month period, the man and his family repeatedly told U.S. officials — including a San Diego immigration court judge, officials with Immigration and Customs Enforcement and border agents with U.S. Customs and Border Protection — that they were not safe in Tijuana, the lawyer said."

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