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Judge agrees to postpone sentencing for Michael Flynn after unleashing a furious rebuke on him in court

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President Donald Trump’s first national security adviser, Michael Flynn, asked a federal judge to delay sentencing for lying to FBI agents about his contacts with Russia.

The retired U.S. Army lieutenant general pleaded guilty to lying to investigators in January 2017 about his contacts with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak during the presidential transition, and the judge blasted Flynn in court during his sentencing hearing.

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“You were an unregistered agent of a foreign country while serving as the National Security Adviser to the president,” said Judge Emmet Sullivan. “Arguably, this undermines everything this flag over here stands for. Arguably, you sold your country out.”

However, Sullivan walked back those statements after a half-hour recess requested by Flynn, saying his contact with foreign agents took place before he was in the White House and clarified another remark.

“I’m not suggesting he committed treason,” Sullivan said, after asking prosecutors if they had considered that charge. “Don’t read too much into the questions I asked.”

After the recess, defense attorneys changed course and said they would take up Sullivan on his repeated offers to delay the sentencing.

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The judge set a status hearing for March 13.

Flynn had agreed to cooperate with special counsel Robert Mueller, who said in sentencing documents that Flynn had provided “substantial” assistance to the investigation and at least two others, but he has since claimed the FBI tricked him into making misleading statements.

Trump, in a Tuesday morning tweet, appeared to encourage his close campaign aide to stick with those claims, which have been amplified by White House officials and the president’s personal lawyers, during the sentencing hearing.

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But his attorneys told the judge that Flynn did not believe he was trapped into lying and accepted full responsibility for his actions, and they did not wish to delay the sentencing hearing.

However, they changed their mind after Sullivan unloaded on Flynn, who offered to provide additional testimony to prosecutors in exchange for a lighter sentence.

Flynn has already met with investigators 19 times, according to prosecutors, and has also admitted to lying about his undisclosed lobbying for Turkey’s government and other research work.

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He resigned from the White House in February 2017, after serving just 24 days.


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Sondland was going to testify Trump gave the impression they should coordinate with Giuliani on Ukraine: report

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European Union Ambassador Gordon Sondland is slated to give testimony Thursday to the House committees on President Donald Trump's Ukraine scandal.

Sondland was slated to tell investigators that Trump gave him the impression that he and two other officials should coordinate with the president's personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, The New York Times said in an explosive report Wednesday.

"That command effectively created a foreign policy back channel that cut the State Department and National Security Council out of deliberations involving a pivotal ally against Russia," The Times reported.

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Trump’s lawyers are trying to tell Appeals Court they actually won the taxes lawsuit — but are still appealing

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Oct. 7, a federal judge dismissed Trump's efforts in a 75-page opinion calling the White House claim "extraordinary."

U.S. District Judge Victor Marrero explained that no occupant of the White House enjoys "absolute immunity from criminal process of any kind." Such a position "would constitute an overreach of executive power."

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Nate Silver claps back at right-wing pollster for accusing him of fraud

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One of the worst-performing national pollsters in the 2018 election cycle was Rasmussen Reports, a right-leaning outfit that is consistently the only one to show President Donald Trump with a net positive approval rating. In 2018, Rasmussen showed Republicans leading the generic congressional ballot by 1 point — but Democrats won the popular vote by 8.4 points.

Nonetheless, Rasmussen is proud of its methodology and particularly irritated when polling analyst and FiveThirtyEight founder Nate Silver points out their inaccuracy. Over the past two weeks, they have twice accused him of "fraud" and characterized his analyses as "corrupt."

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