Quantcast
Connect with us

Dems to investigate Trump’s alleged money laundering — and his secret meeting with Putin

Published

on

House Democrats plan to launch a wide-ranging probe of President Donald Trump’s ties to Russia — with a focus on alleged money laundering.

The Democratic majority intends to hold a series of public hearings that would take place during the 2020 campaign to examine the president’s financial ties to Russian oligarchs, and to question the interpreter present during Trump’s face-to-face meeting with Vladimir Putin, reported Axios.

ADVERTISEMENT

The aggressive plans were laid out Tuesday by a Democratic lawmaker during a roundtable discussion with reporters, and that congressional member said the majority plans interviews with new witnesses and follow-up interviews with witnesses that Republicans allowed to “stonewall.”

At least three committees are involved in the planned hearings.

The House Intelligence Committee will coordinate with House Financial Services to investigate possible money laundering, and Axios reporter Jonathan Swan told MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” that congressional investigators were particularly interested in the $400 million in cash Trump spent on real estate in the 2000s.

“In the nine years before he ran for president,” the Washington Post reported in May 2018, “Donald Trump’s company spent more than $400 million in cash on new properties — including 14 transactions paid for in full, without borrowing from banks — during a buying binge that defied real estate industry practices and Trump’s own history as the self-described ‘King of Debt.'”

Democrats are also considering investigations into Trump’s private meeting with Putin, and may subpoena the interpreter or the interpreter’s notes, and they intend to probe the president and his family’s dealings in Russia during the 2016 campaign.

ADVERTISEMENT

“If we didn’t look at his business,” the Democratic lawmaker said, “we wouldn’t know what we know now about his efforts to pursue what may have been the most lucrative deal of his life, the Trump Tower in Moscow — something the special counsel’s office has said stood to earn the family hundreds of millions of dollars.”


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Can pets get COVID-19? It’s complicated

Published

on

News surfaced yesterday that a tiger at New York's Bronx Zoo tested positive for the novel coronavirus. The discovery raises new questions about whether pets can contract the virus, and if it is contagious from pets (or zoo animals) to humans.

This article first appeared in Salon.

Nadia, a four-year-old Malayan tiger who lives at the Bronx Zoo, was suffering from a dry cough and loss of appetite, which prompted the test for novel coronavirus. Nadia's symptoms were first noticed on March 27, and zoo officials decided to test her "out of an abundance of caution," according to a statement from the Wildlife Conservation Society.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Peter Navarro warned Trump coronavirus could kill 500,000 Americans — back in January: NYT

Published

on

President Donald Trump was warned COVID-19 could be catastrophic, according to a bombshell new report published online by The New York Times on Monday evening.

"A top White House adviser starkly warned Trump administration officials in late January that the coronavirus crisis could cost the United States trillions of dollars and put millions of Americans at risk of illness or death," the newspaper reported.

"The warning, written in a memo by Peter Navarro, President Trump’s trade adviser, is the highest-level alert known to have circulated inside the West Wing as the administration was taking its first substantive steps to confront a crisis that had already consumed China’s leaders and would go on to upend life in Europe and the United States," The Times continued.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Oil prices jump on hopes for output cut deal

Published

on

Oil prices rebounded Tuesday on fresh hopes an OPEC-led meeting this week will reach an agreement to reduce oversupply and shore up the market.

Prices have fallen sharply since expectations for a quick deal to cut output levels were dashed, but the rescheduling to Thursday of a meeting of major crude producers boosted sentiment.

US benchmark West Texas Intermediate was up 3.83 percent to $27.08 a barrel in Asian morning trade.

A barrel of Brent crude, the international benchmark, was trading 2.81 percent higher at $33.98.

Prices fell to 18-year lows last week as the market wallowed in oversupply arising from a price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia, which have ramped up production.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image