Quantcast
Connect with us

Russian spy Maria Butina promoted anti-American militia groups while cozying up to NRA leaders

Published

on

NRA leadership embraced Russian double agent Maria Butina during the same period that she helped to arm anti-American groups overseas.

Butina actively supported Russian President Vladimir Putin’s military takeover of Crimea with a March 2014 news conference with a pro-Russian separatist group, and just four weeks later traveled to Indianapolis to meet with NRA executives, reported Mother Jones.

ADVERTISEMENT

She touted her Kremlin connections at the news conference, held with the leader of the pro-Russian separatist group the Crimean Front, and Butina also mentioned a civilian gun initiative by Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitri Rogozin.

The gun group intended to expand into Crimea, and separatist group leader Sergei Veselovsky asked whether civilians could be armed to fight off Ukrainian militants rumored to be heading into the region.

“We will try to help maximally, of course, on the legal front,” Butina assured the Crimean Front Leader. “We’ll tell people how to do it absolutely right, and how to behave in a self-defense scenario.”

Veselovsky had led a “Cossack self-defense unit” that just weeks earlier had stormed the offices of the independent Crimean Center for Investigative Journalism, and the journalists inside fled to Kiev as the militia group denounced them as “American agents.”

The Crimean Front then took over the outlet, which was renamed “News Front” and is now reportedly funded by Russia security service, and push out anti-American content attacking U.S. sanctions and special counsel Robert Mueller.

ADVERTISEMENT

Shortly after establishing public ties to the Crimean militia group, Butina was greeted as a VIP by top NRA officials at their annual conference in Indiana.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

WATCH: Saturday Night Live airs Christmas special — that’s just one giant dig at the Electoral College

Published

on

NBC's "Saturday Night Live" aired an opening skit that was just one giant attack on the electoral college.

A snowman introduced the segment, saying that we could look in on the holiday table conversation thanks to hacked Nest cams.

The skit featured a house in San Francisco, California, a second in Charleston, South Carolina and a third in Atlanta, Georgia.

Each dinner table debated impeachment, and the differences between President Donald Trump and his predecessor, President Barack Obama.

But then the snowman said that none of their votes matter.

"They'll debate the issues all year long, but then it all comes down to 1,000 people in Wisconsin who won't even think about the election until the morning of," the snowman said. "And that's the magic of the Electoral College."

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Georgia mayor being recalled for racism resigns from office: report

Published

on

Hoschton Mayor Theresa Kenerly resigned in a special city council meeting held on Saturday, the Atlanta Journal Constitution reported Saturday.

"The resignation came just days after Councilman Jim Cleveland resigned saying he‘d rather leave office on his own terms than face voters in a recall election next month," the newspaper reported. "Both resignations follow an AJC investigation launched seven months ago into claims that an African American candidate for city administrator was sidetracked by Mayor Theresa Kenerly because of his race."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Nine 2020 Democrats unite to demand DNC Chair Tom Perez scrap debate rules: report

Published

on

The Democratic National Committee is facing a revolt for the party's 2020 presidential candidates for its restrictive debate rules.

"Nine Democratic presidential candidates, including the party's front-runners, are urging the Democratic National Committee to toss out the current polling and fundraising rules used to determine who appears in televised debates and reopen the exchanges to better reflect the historic diversity of the current field. The candidates say the rules exclude diverse candidates in the field from participating," CBS News reported Saturday evening.

Continue Reading