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Paul Krugman shreds Trump for claiming ‘war on poverty is over’ as more Americans struggle to survive

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]New York Times columnist Paul Krugman went on a tweetstorm Saturday morning about an easily-overlooked economic report the Trump White House released earlier in the week.

Krugman pointed out that “with everything else” going on in Trumpworld — a reference to the newly-submitted report by special counsel Robert Mueller on Russian collusion — many may have missed the Economic Report from the President that included apparent joke references to “interns” like Jabba the Hutt and Spider-Man.

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The report “says that we basically have no policy in America,” Krugman wrote, noting that a few years prior, former House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) issued his own report “claiming that the War on Poverty should be [canceled] because it completely failed to reduce poverty.”

Donald Trump’s administration, the columnist wrote, now says the “War on Poverty” should be canceled because it was won by America.

“Let’s focus on the absurdity and cruelty of the no-poverty claim,” Krugman mused, writing that the US Census found that 5.7 percent of the American population lives on less than half the total annual income of the official poverty line.

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“For a single parent with two children, the poverty threshold is $19,749,” he noted. “So the White House is basically saying that a single mother with 2 kids and an income of $10K, that is, half the poverty line is … not poor.”

“Does anyone who has ever stepped outside a gated suburban community believe that?” the columnist wondered.

Krugman noted nine percent of Americans are still uninsured and questioned the government’s numbers.

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“Do you really believe that the number of poor people is only a quarter as large as the number of uninsured?” he wrote.

“I know that complete lack of empathy or understanding of other people’s hardship is basically a required qualification to serve in the Trump admin,” Krugman concluded. “Still, this really beggars belief.”

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CNN’s Bakari Sellers schools Rick Santorum over claim Trump is not part of the ‘extreme hard right’

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During a panel discussion on CNN's State of the Union, contributor Bakari Sellers set fellow panelist Rick Santorum straight after he tried to claim that Donald Trump doesn't take far-right positions.

Following a discussion on Sen. Bernie Sanders' Nevada caucus win, Santorum tried to note the major differences between Trump and Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Responding to conservative commentator Linda Chavez who called both Sanders and Trump "two angry people," Santorum remarked, "I wanted to take issue with what Linda said: two angry folks representing the extremes, and I would agree with that, with Bernie Sanders, and he is representing, no question, the extreme of the Democratic Party and he says that he is a socialist and he is angry, I agree."

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GOP lawmakers melt down after Maryland AP history class teacher uses illustration to compare Trump to Nazis

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According to a report from the Washington Times, Maryland Republicans are up in arms after an AP history teacher at a local high school used a slide to illustrate similarities between Donald Trump's policies and those of the Nazis.

The report states, "A slide used in an Advanced Placement history class at Loch Raven High School in Towson shows a picture of Trump above pictures of a Nazi swastika and a flag of the Soviet Union. Two captions read 'wants to round up a group of people and build a giant wall' and 'oh, THAT is why it sounds so familiar!'"

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Stop praising anti-Trump evangelicals: Their embrace of authoritarianism is a big part of the problem

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At this critical moment for American democracy our media landscape is doing a poor job in its coverage of conservative white evangelicals. Coverage of this relatively large segment of the population is characterized by, on the one hand, effusive praise for the slightest milquetoast criticism of Donald Trump, and on the other, by a periodic parade of nearly interchangeable unfounded predictions about how evangelical youth are going to change America’s most radically right-wing demographic for the better—any day now. In the words of the great sage Bullwinkle J. Moose, “This time for sure!”

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