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Paul Manafort gets additional 43 months in prison in second sentencing for conspiracy charges

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President Donald Trump’s former campaign chief Paul Manafort was sentenced to an additional 43 months in prison on Wednesday in a case related to special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson sentenced Manafort to 73 months in prison, but said 30 of the months would run concurrently with a sentence in a separate case.

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Manafort pleaded guilty to two counts of conspiracy last year, which each carried a maximum sentence of five years in prison. At his sentencing hearing, Manafort said he was sorry for what he had done.

But the federal judge had a harsh response to his request for leniency.

“It’s hard to overstate the number of lies, the amount of fraud and the extraordinary amount of money involved” in his crimes, said Jackson.

“Court is one of those places where facts still matter,” she added.

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In a separate case, Manafort was sentenced to nearly four years in prison by a federal judge last week after being convicted of five counts of filing false income tax returns, two counts of bank fraud and one count of failing to report a foreign bank account. Manafort was also ordered to pay $24 million in restitution and a $50,000 fine.

The sentences mean Manafort will spend a total of more than 7 years in prison.


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‘Time for a new special counsel’: Ex-DOJ inspector general calls for formal probe of Trump-Ukraine calls

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A veteran law enforcement official called for a new special counsel investigation of President Donald Trump's communications with the Ukrainian president.

An intelligence official filed a whistleblower complaint against the president, and speculation has begun to focus the report concerns Trump's efforts to pressure Ukraine to dig up dirt on Joe Biden in exchange for U.S. aid -- and former Justice Department official Michael Bromwich called for a formal probe.

"Time for a new Special Counsel," Bromwich tweeted.

Bromwich -- inspector general for the Department of Justice from 1994-1999, former assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York and associate counsel in the Office of Independent Counsel for Iran-Contra -- was responding to a summation of the allegations against Trump.

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Defiant Trump tells reporters ‘it doesn’t matter what I discussed’ with Ukrainian PM — then smears Joe Biden

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A defiant President Donald Trump said on Friday that whatever he told Ukraine's prime minister about seeking dirt on former Vice President Joe Biden wasn't important.

As reported by CNN's Jim Acosta, the president told reporters in the Oval Office that "it doesn’t matter what I discussed" recently with Ukrainian Prime Minister Oleksiy Honcharuk, and then pivoted to attacking Biden.

"Someone ought to look into Joe Biden," the president said.

In Oval, Trump tells reporters when asked about Ukraine and whistleblower “it doesn’t matter what i discussed” and adds “someone ought to look into Joe Biden” (per WH pool).

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Trump’s excuses for Ukraine call obliterated by ex-Bush national security aide

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Appearing with MSNBC's Stephanie Ruhle, a former National Security Council staffer under President George W. Bush knocked down Donald Trump's claims about his scandalous call with the president of Ukraine where he reportedly offered military aid in exchange for opposition research on former VP Joe Biden.

With the president asserting that people other than the whistleblower were aware of his comments and didn't object, former presidential special assistant Michael Allen, said that would be unlikely.

"That is not necessarily true," Allen explained. "In the White House, there are people listening in on the conversations, properly, for the purpose of taking notes. A greater number of people see transcripts. But I don't think it is the case that, just because one person came forward, that others wouldn't or couldn't corroborate that story."

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