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Rudy Giuliani calls Barr’s letter ‘complete exoneration’ — but refuses to say if they’ll release the report to the public

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President Donald Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani called Attorney General Bill Barr’s letter “complete exoneration” and told CNN’s Dana Bash that Robert Mueller’s findings were “better than I expected.”

Similarly, Jay Sekulow said that because Mueller didn’t find “conspiracy” then any efforts to obstruct justice are void because there was no crime.

“I mean, I’d like it all to happen because if it doesn’t, somebody’s going to say there’s something hidden there,” Giuliani said. “Let me say this for the 400th time, the president did not do anything wrong. He didn’t engage in collusion. I think now that’s proven beyond any doubt. And he did not engage in any kind of obstruction of justice known to man. Unless he can obstruct justice somewhere in the head, this is ridiculous.”

Giuliani also admitted that he has been involved in talking with former Watergate prosecutors this week, but did not explain why.

Both Giuliani and Sekulow would not commit to publishing the documents to the public. It’s unclear why they would refuse transparency if they believe the president was exonerated.

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“Look, no crime was committed, so what’s he going to do obstruct an investigation of no crime?” Giuliani repeated.

The fact isn’t true. An excellent example would be that Martha Stewart was charged and convicted with obstruction of justice when there was no underlying crime charged.

Mueller’s report has not yet been released, but Barr wrote a summary letter with his own findings on the report.

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At 82, NASA pioneer Sue Finley still reaching for the stars

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Sue Finley began work at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory as the US prepared to launch its first satellite into orbit in 1958, racing to match the Soviet Union, which had accomplished the feat months earlier.

Now 82, she is one of NASA's longest-serving women, starting out as one of its "human computers," whose critical yet long-hidden contributions to the space program, including the Apollo missions to the Moon, are finally being recognized.

Finley had dropped out of college and joined a group of mathematically gifted individuals, overwhelmingly women, whose job it was to solve the complex equations thrown at them by rocket scientists before electronic computing became affordable and reliable.

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Philippines’ Duterte mulls cutting Iceland ties over UN probe

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte is "seriously considering" cutting his nation's diplomatic ties with Iceland after it spearheaded a UN resolution to probe his deadly drug war, the leader's spokesman said.

Duterte bristles at any Western condemnation of his signature campaign, which has killed thousands and critics say could amount to crimes against humanity.

The comments late Monday from presidential spokesman Salvador Panelo came in response to the UN Human Rights Council last week backing the Iceland-proposed resolution to review the killings.

"(Duterte) is seriously considering cutting diplomatic relations with Iceland," Panelo said in a statement.

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AIDS deaths down a third since 2010: UN

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HIV-related deaths last year fell to around 770,000 -- some 33 percent lower than in 2010 -- the United Nations said Tuesday, but warned that global efforts to eradicate the disease were stalling as funding dries up.

An estimated 37.9 million people now live with HIV -- a record 23.3 million of those have access to some antiretroviral therapy (ART), UNAIDS said in its annual report.

Highlighting the enormous progress made since the height of the AIDS epidemic in the mid-1990s, the report showed that the number people dying from the disease fell from 800,000 in 2017 to 770,000 last year.

The figure was down by more than a third from 2010, when there were 1.2 million AIDS-related deaths.

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