Quantcast
Connect with us

Trump effect: Hate crimes doubled in counties that hosted president’s rallies

Published

on

Counties that hosted one of President Donald Trump’s rallies saw hate crimes spike more than 200 percent afterward on average.

The president has adamantly insisted that his rhetoric does not incite violence, but recent analyses appear to show a link between his 2016 campaign and acts of violence or bullying, reported the Washington Post.

Counties that hosted a Trump rally during the 2016 campaign saw a 226 increase in reported hate crimes compared to comparable counties that did not, according to a new study.

ADVERTISEMENT

Researchers aggregated hate-crime incident data and Trump rally data to the county level, factoring in crime rates, the number of active hate groups, minority populations, college education rates, geographical location and which month the rallies took place.

The researchers admit their analysis cannot pin blame for the hate crimes on Trump’s campaign rhetoric, but they said their statistical analysis shows a strong correlation between his campaign rallies and reported hate crimes.

They also pointed out that a considerable number of reported hate crimes — including vandalism, intimidation and assault — specifically reference the president’s name.

Another recent study in Virginia found incidents of racist bullying increased at schools in counties that backed President Donald Trump — and actually decreased in areas carried by Hillary Clinton.

The FBI’s Universal Crime report also found reported hate crimes jumped 17 percent overall from 2016 to 2017, and recent research shows that reading or hearing Trump’s statements of bias against particular groups makes people more likely to write offensive statements about those groups.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘Don’t let him rewrite history’: GOP ex-congressman slams Trump for painting fewer than 100,000 COVID-19 deaths as a victory

Published

on

At Wednesday's coronavirus task force press conference, President Donald Trump reiterated his claim that if fewer than 100,000 Americans die from COVID-19, it will be a victory for him.

Former Rep. Joe Walsh (R-IL) had none of it.

He ignored the warnings. He ignored the scientists & doctors. He refused to prepare. He lied about the virus. This country wasn’t ready. People got sick. People died. People lost their jobs. Because he cared more about himself than the country.

Don’t let him rewrite history. https://t.co/9snqoJ1VQI

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Wisconsin GOP plots to strip Democratic governor of more power — a day after forcing voters to stand outside in a pandemic

Published

on

This week, Republicans in the Wisconsin legislature have faced national fury after their successful lawsuits blocking Democratic Gov. Tony Evers from delaying the election and extending absentee voting.

But just one day after tens of thousands of voters were forced to stand in public lines and risk COVID-19 exposure just to exercise their constitutional right to vote, the Wisconsin GOP found yet another way to weaponize the pandemic for partisan gain.

According to Molly Beck of the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Republicans in the legislature have slipped a provision into the state's relief bill authorizing unemployment disbursement under the federal CARES Act, that would allow the state's Finance Committee to make budget cuts without input from Evers — stripping him of power at exactly the moment when the public would be looking to the governor for help.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

CDC quietly deletes hydroxychloroquine guidance as study hyped by Trump comes into question

Published

on

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Tuesday quietly removed bizarre guidelines for using the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a potential treatment for the new coronavirus. The unproven treatment has been repeatedly hyped by President Donald Trump in spite of the warnings of Dr. Anthony Fauci.

The CDC published "highly unusual" dosing guidance based on "unattributed anecdotes rather than peer-reviewed science" last month amid pressure on federal health officials from Trump, Reuters reported. The agency now appears to have quietly removed those guidelines from its website this week.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image