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Trump’s brand of racism is fueling the white nationalist movement worldwide: report

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According to a report at HuffPo, white nationalist movements in countries around the world are looking with admiration at the rise of President Donald Trump and modeling some of their rhetoric after his.

The report notes that racist elements in countries including Canada and Germany have even taken to wearing Trump’s “Make America Great Again” red hats as part of their own homeland drive to attack minorities.

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“‘Make America Great Again’ has become more than a U.S. political slogan … for white nationalist, radical right and anti-immigrant extremists all over the world, it’s a symbol; a kind of political messaging that transcends the specifics of country and language,” the report explains.

According to one expert, the implicit message that the hat delivers in the U.S. transcends borders.

“The hat and the MAGA acronym have really become shorthand for this white nationalist movement,” explained Barbara Perry, a professor at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology.

According to a 2018 study undertaken by extremism researcher J.M. Berger, the most common word found on alt-right Twitter and social media accounts was “MAGA” along with “Trump supporter.”

“This embrace of pro-Trump symbols isn’t limited to social media,” the report continues. “MAGA hats and slogans have shown up in Britain at rallies supporting anti-Muslim activist Tommy Robinson, on banners in Australia following the terror attack in Christchurch, New Zealand, and as an accessory for prominent European white nationalists who wear it to troll their fellow citizens.”

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The report goes on to note that, “MAGA symbols abroad aren’t solely the province of extremists, but they tend to attract a certain type. Anti-immigrant, anti-Muslim politicians, in particular, have adopted the Trump-associated slogans and paraphernalia.”

According to the report, far-right politicians overseas are also studying the way Trump inflames white nationalist passions and are adopting his ways to bash immigrants within their own countries.

“Beyond mimicking Trump’s rhetoric to rile up nationalist sentiment in their own countries, the international far right embraces the U.S. president because he helps bolster the narrative of rising support for a global anti-immigrant, anti-establishment movement,” the report continues. ” When the most powerful person in the world says that ‘Islam hates us’ and attempts to ban Muslim immigration, it’s proof that perhaps other world leaders can achieve a similar goal.”

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‘The country got an education’: Nicolle Wallace explains why impeachment could move public opinion

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MSNBC anchor Nicolle Wallace offered her analysis after the day of televised hearings in the impeachment inquiry.

Wallace, who served as White House communications director under President George W. Bush, drew upon her experience as a top Republican strategist.

"Listen, I haven’t spent a nanosecond in a courtroom, but I’ve spent my career in the court of public opinion. And if you look at what the Democrats have set out to do and you look at why this has swung public opinion in a way the Mueller probe never did is that they have laid brick on top of brick on top of brick," Wallace explained.

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Room erupts in laughter as Democrat Peter Welch destroys Jim Jordan during impeachment hearing

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There was a moment of levity four-hours into the first televised hearing in the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.

Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH), the bombastic Freedom Caucus member who was added to the committee at the last moment by Republicans, had argued that the White House whistleblower started the scandal.

"There’s one witness, one witness that they won’t bring in front of us, they won’t bring in front of the American people, and that’s the guy who started it all, the whistleblower," Jordan argued.

Unfortunately for the wrestling coach turned politician, Jordan was followed by Rep. Peter Welch (D-VT).

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Constitutional law expert Laurence Tribe succinctly debunks Jim Jordan’s defense of Trump

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Constitutional law expert Laurence Tribe debunked the key defense of President Donald Trump that was offered by Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) during the first televised hearing in the impeachment inquiry.

Jordan did not address the fact President Donald Trump solicited foreign election interference in violation of federal law, but attempted to debunk the additional charge that there was extortion/bribery.

The Ohio Republican argued that there could not have been a quid pro quo because the aid was eventually released.

But Tribe, who has taught at Harvard Law for half a century and argued three dozen cases before the United States Supreme Court, fact-checked the congressman who never passed the bar exam.

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