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Historian reveals alarming similarities between Trump’s ‘concentration camps’ and Nazi Germany

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As Republican lawmakers furiously deny that President Donald Trump is holding migrant families in “concentration camps” along the border, historians have been charting the alarming parallels with Nazi Germany.

Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) and Rep. Dan Crenshaw (R-TX) angrily disputed Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), who compared Trump’s detention centers to Nazi concentration camps, but historian Ned Richardson-Little pointed out just how similar current conditions are to Germany in the 1930s.

“One of the enduring myths of the Nazi era is that average Germans didn’t know what was happening to persecuted groups including the Jews,” Richardson-Little tweeted. “Everyone knew about the round ups and the deportations – they were impossible to miss in daily life.”

Many Germans saw those concentration camps as a “sensible policy,” rather than state-sponsored terrorization, intended to deal with Jewish immigrants and social and political “deviants,” the historian wrote.

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Nazi propaganda mapped out a worldwide Jewish conspiracy that posed an existential threat to the racial purity of the “Aryan” people, and also linked Jews to everyday crimes — such as illegal drugs and narcotics.

That proved effective for those who weren’t persuaded by anti-Semitic conspiracy theories about worldwide Jewish domination, Richardson-Little wrote.

Nazis wanted Germans to fear the camps, the historian wrote, while also reassuring the public that conditions there were humane.

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That disconnect also provided an alibi after war, when Germans insisted they did not know what was going on at the concentration camps.

“They merely supported a state policy to take deviants away from society to be housed in humane facilities where they could do no harm,” Richardson-Little wrote.

But that simply isn’t true, he argued.

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“There was excessive evidence of the horrors of what was happening in the camps and the violence and death inherent to the Nazi project,” Richardson-Little wrote. “But the Third Reich provided its citizens a veneer of respectability that they could cling to as a shield to avoid confronting this reality.”


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Black couple’s marriage proposal party interrupted multiple times by white security guards accusing them of theft

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According to a report at WHEC, a black couple who drove to a park where the man intended to propose were interrupted and harassed three times by security guards who accused them of stealing a T-shirt at a gift shop.

In a Facebook post, Cathy-Marie Hamlet explained that she and her fiancé, Clyde Jackson, were sitting at a table outside the Angry Orchard gift shop when a female security guard approached them and accused Jackson of stealing the shirt and asked to check his pockets.

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Mueller’s investigation did nothing to stop the next Russian attack: Cybersecurity expert

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The special counsel investigation of Russian election interference accomplished almost nothing to prevent further attacks on U.S. democracy, according to a cybersecurity expert.

Robert Mueller's investigation resulted in convictions for former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort and his deputy Rick Gates, along with former national security adviser Mike Flynn and others, but the former FBI director had little authority to hold Russian agents accountable for the crimes he uncovered, wrote cybersecurity analyst Robert Johnson for The Daily Beast.

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Want to meet with the Trump Administration? Donald Trump Jr.’s hunting buddy Tommy Hicks can help

Tommy Hicks Jr. isn’t in government, but he’s a longtime pal of the president’s son. That has put him in the room when the administration talks China and 5G policy, and it lets him help others — including one friend who had $143 million riding on the outcome.

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Over the past two years, the Trump administration has been grappling with how to handle the transition to the next generation of mobile broadband technology. With spending expected to run into hundreds of billions of dollars, the administration views it as an ultra-high-stakes competition between U.S. and Chinese companies, with enormous implications both for technology and for national security. Top officials from a raft of departments have been meeting to hash out the best approach.

ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for The Big Story newsletter to receive stories like this one in your inbox.

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