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WATCH: Trump babbles nonsensically when asked why he said he’d stop spying on Kim Jong-un

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President Donald Trump on Wednesday delivered a strange and nonsensical response when he was asked why he said earlier this week that the CIA under his watch would no longer recruit Kim Jong-un’s family members to work as spies.

During an angry rant in front of reporters on Tuesday, the president seemed apologetic about reports that the CIA had used Kim’s half-brother as a spy on the regime.

“I saw the information about the CIA with respect to his… half-brother and I would tell him that would not happen under my auspice, that’s for sure,” Trump said. “I wouldn’t let that happen under my auspices.”

When asked about this statement, the president seemed to deny making it, then admitted he said it but then claimed he was being misinterpreted.

“No, it’s not what I meant,” Trump began. “It’s what I said. I think it’s different than, maybe, your interpretation. I think we’re going to do very well with North Korea over a period of time. I’m in no rush, the sanctions are on, we got our hostages back, our remains are coming back, you saw the beautiful ceremony in Hawaii with Mike Pence, we’re getting our remains back.”

Trump then discussed the “very nice letter” he received from Kim this week, and then marveled at the way Kim’s family has maintained power over the country for decades.

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“You know, they’ve been there a long time,” he said. “The grandfather, the father, the son, and they’ve been there for a long time, and nobody’s done anything, except me.”

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A massive power outage like Argentina’s could happen in the US

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Argentina and Uruguay are recovering from nationwide power blackouts that cut electricity to tens of millions of people, including some in Paraguay, Chile and Brazil. The blackout’s cause is under investigation, but something similar could happen in the U.S. – and has.

On Aug. 14, 2003, a software bug contributed to a blackout that left 50 million people across nine U.S. northeastern states and a Canadian province without power. The outage lasted for as long as four days, with rolling blackouts in some areas for days after that.

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Justin Trudeau approves controversial pipeline expansion

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The Canadian government on Tuesday approved a controversial pipeline expansion project to deliver oil to the Pacific coast for shipping overseas, setting the stage for a major political battle ahead of elections.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's administration had given the project the go-ahead in 2016 on the grounds it was in Canada's "national interest."

But it was stalled by legal challenges and protests by indigenous groups and environmental activists, and a federal court last August ordered the government to take a second look.

"Today, I am announcing that our government has approved the Trans Mountain expansion project going forward," Trudeau told a press conference in Ottawa.

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US teen killed ‘best friend’ after being promised $9 million online: police

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An American teenager has been charged with conspiring to murder her "best friend" after a man she met online offered her $9 million to commit the crime.

According to investigators, Denali Brehmer, an 18-year-old from Alaska, was recruited to kill her friend by a man a few years her elder, 21-year-old Darin Schilmiller of Indiana.

The pair had previously hooked up online, with Schilmiller assuming a fake identity and posing as a millionaire named "Tyler."

Court documents say that during the course of their online relationship, they discussed a plan to rape and murder someone in Alaska.

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