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Former prosecutor calls Trump ‘dangerous’ for trying to be more powerful than the Supreme Court

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Former federal prosecutor Joyce Vance called President Donald Trump’s behavior “dangerous” on the case surrounding the question on the census.

In a panel discussion on MSNBC, Vance pointed out that Trump is a president that generally doesn’t like to follow the rule of law.

“We see that across a variety of different issues,” Vance said. “But here we’re really squarely presenting this issue of a lawless president who believes his opinions and his views should carry more weight than Supreme Court decisions. And that’s dangerous territory. This appeal to voters saying, ‘If we don’t like the Supreme Court’s decision, then they must be bad judges,’ is the sort of pernicious argument that does enormous damage to democracy over time.”

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Matt Zapotosky, Washington Post national security reporter, explained that it’s clear that neither Trump nor Attorney General Bill Barr has any idea what the strategy is, despite saying there is one. They’ve changed their story on it ten times in just four months.

Last week, the Justice Department conceded that there was no real way to get the questionnaire on the census, yet somehow they all decided it’s going to happen anyway.

“The census is being printed as we speak without the question and the Justice Department had previously represented to the court if they couldn’t get it on by a date certain by July 1st, I think it was, then they were done,” Zapotosky said. “And now, apparently, they’re not. But no one is really willing to say what they’re going to do.”

As with many issues, the Trump White House seems thrown into turmoil over another problem of their own making.

Watch the full panel discussion below:

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Teenage boy’s family objects to ProPublica publication of video detailing his death

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The family of a teenage boy whose death ProPublica investigated has objected to the publication of a surveillance video that documented his last hours.

Yesterday, ProPublica published a detailed account of failings and missteps by the U.S. Border Patrol, in whose custody 16-year-old Carlos Gregorio Hernandez Vasquez died. As part of the story, ProPublica published several moments from a lengthy surveillance video in which Carlos struggles on the floor of his cell and then stops moving. The video, which had not been shared with Congress or the public, contradicts the government’s claim that Carlos was discovered as a result of a “welfare check.’’ It shows that his cellmate awoke, saw his motionless body, and summoned Border Patrol agents.

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Mass rally marks six-month anniversary of Hong Kong protest movement

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Hong Kong democracy protesters are hoping for huge crowds later Sunday at a rally they have billed as a "last chance" for the city's pro-Beijing leaders in a major test for the six-month-old movement.

The march comes two weeks after pro-establishment parties got a drubbing in local elections, shattering government claims that a "silent majority" opposed the protests.

But activists say public anger is building once more after chief executive Carrie Lam and Beijing ruled out any further concessions despite the landslide election defeat.

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Pensacola gunman showed mass shooting videos at party: report

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The Saudi military student who carried out a deadly shooting spree at a US naval base showed videos of mass shootings at a dinner party the night before the attack, The New York Times reported Saturday.

The shooting Friday in a classroom building at Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida left three dead and eight wounded, including two responding sheriff's deputies.

The revelation about the dinner party came as authorities probed whether the shooter had any accomplices.

"We're finding out what took place, whether it's one person or a number of people," President Donald Trump told reporters. "We'll get to the bottom of it very quickly.

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