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WATCH: Ted Lieu calls Trump a ‘racist ass’ on live TV

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Rep. Ted Lieu (D-CA) on Sunday called President Donald Trump a “racist a**” on live television.

Lieu made the remarks on MSNBC after he was asked about Trump’s call for non-white Democrats to “go back” to their country of origin.

“As an immigrant myself, I know that when we came to America, we were poor,” Lieu recalled. “My parents went to flea markets to sell gifts to make ends meet, and eventually they opened a successful small business and achieved the American dream. It’s one of the reasons I joined the Air Force.”

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“I never thought I’d see the day when a president was telling immigrants to go back to where they came from,” the congressman lamented. “He’s demonstrating he’s a racist ass. He’s not uniting us.”

Earlier, Lieu had called Trump a “racist ass” on Twitter.

Lieu also told MSNBC that Trump is “becoming increasingly more and more unhinged as he sees things are going against him.”

“He has not been able to build his wall or make the border situation any better and now he’s trying to do other things to amp up his base,” Lieu remarked. “He doesn’t understand most Americans are immigrants or have family members who are immigrants.”

Watch the video below from MSNBC.

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Congress still has one big tool left to rein in Trump’s corruption: Oversight Committee Democrat

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Senate Republicans may have managed to quash the impeachment trial without calling forth any new witnesses or seriously considering the evidence against President Donald Trump. And the president may feel vindicated and largely invulnerable as a result.

But, Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL) told CNN's Anderson Cooper on Monday, that doesn't mean Democrats don't have one last big play to rein in the president's abuses of power. They can use the first and strongest authority delegated to them: the power of the purse.

"What can Democrats really do when it comes to oversight of the president?" asked Cooper. "I mean, now that impeachment is over, does seem like there are fewer and fewer guardrails, if any."

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Trump said he ‘loved’ the fact that America is more divided than ever: ex-GOP congressman

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President Donald Trump bragged about increasing divisions in America during a White House meeting, a former Republican congressman explained on MSNBC on Monday.

Former Rep. David Jolly (R-FL) told host Joy Reid that "Donald Trump has intentionally tried to create the anxiety" that Americans are explaining.

"Garry Kasparov, the Russian freedom activist, has said the point of disinformation isn't to manipulate the truth, it's to exhaust your critical thinking," Jolly explained. "To exhaust your critical thinking, that's what we're experiencing as voters."

"I had a colleague that was in a meeting in the Roosevelt Room and he said he heard Trump say, 'Have you ever seen the nation so divided?' My colleagues and others said, 'No, we haven't.' Trump said, 'I love it that way.' This is the currency that he's peddling as political strategy, but it's not one we have to accept," Jolly explained.

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CNN

The depths of Trump’s paranoia: One person who may know him the best explains what’s ahead

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President Donald Trump's biographer, Michael d'Antonio, knows a great deal about his life, his behavior, and his long history of paranoia. A piece in The New York Times Monday summed up the president's state of mind during the impeachment with one word: "paranoid."

Speaking to the long history of paranoia, d'Antonio recalled that in Trump's book The Art of the Comeback, he wrote ten tips for an effective comeback. No. 3, he said, was "be paranoid."

"He thinks that paranoia is an effective strategy when it comes to managing people and when it comes to doing business," said the biographer. "And I think all of the attitudes that we see him bring into the presidency are things that evidence themselves early in his life. So, he's never trusted people very readily and is very quick to identify someone as an enemy. And then try to root out those who aren't loyal enough. So paranoia is something that's always been a trait for the president, and he considers it a useful, even constructive thing."

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