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Is the UN trolling Trump by scheduling him to speak in the middle of ‘Dictator Day’?

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On Tuesday, President Donald Trump is scheduled to give his speech before the United Nations General Assembly.

But as Politico noted, the logistics of the lineup conspicuously put Trump in the middle of a long list of brutal dictators who are also scheduled to speak.

Before Trump on the schedule is Jair Bolsonaro, the recently elected president of Brazil who is linked to paramilitary gangs and has claimed that the only problem with his country’s former military dictatorship was that it maybe should have killed even more dissidents.

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Then after Trump finishes, he will be followed by Egyptian President Abdul Fattah el-Sisi, whose regime has rolled back human rights reforms by executive fiat, imprisoned rivals, and conducted massacres, as well as Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, who routinely arrests people for making fun of him and who recently held a sham referendum to rewrite his nation’s constitution.

“The initial speaking order at the world’s top diplomatic gathering is a coincidence,” stressed Politico, “and yet it serves as a vivid reminder of democracy’s declining fortunes around the world. It’s also already drawing attention to Trump’s repeated encouragement, and occasional emulation, of authoritarian leaders.”

Politico noted that Trump has “spoken of his ‘love’ for North Korea’s Kim Jong Un, praised Russia’s Vladimir Putin as ‘strong,’ downplayed Saudi Arabia’s killing of U.S.-based journalist Jamal Khashoggi, spoken warmly of China’s Xi Jinping and reportedly referred to Egypt’s Sisi as ‘my favorite dictator.’ (On Monday, ahead of their bilateral meeting in New York, Trump called Sisi ‘my friend’ and called him ‘a real leader’ who has ‘done some things that are absolutely amazing in a short period of time.’)”

“Even if Trump does speak extensively Tuesday about promoting democracy, his past actions and comments are likely to undermine his credibility on the issue, observers say,” the article continued. “What’s in little dispute is that democracy has suffered setbacks globally in recent years, the result of rising populist sentiments and crushed democratic rebellions, among other factors.”


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WATCH: Franklin Graham tells Jeanine Pirro coronavirus pandemic is because of people sinning

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Franklin Graham blamed sinners for the COVID-19 coronavirus epidemic during a Saturday night appearance on Fox News.

Host Jeanine Pirro noted the growing death toll and wondered how God could let that happen.

"Well, I don't think it's God's plan for this to happen," Graham said.

"It's because of the sin that's in the world, judge," he argued.

"Man has turned his back on God, we have sinned against him, and we need to ask for God's forgiveness and that's what Easter's all about," he continued.

"This pandemic, this is the result of a fallen world that has turned its back on God," he added.

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Drought causing water shortage amid coronavirus crisis in Chile

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With historically low river flows and reservoirs running dry due to drought, people in central Chile have found themselves particularly vulnerable to the coronavirus pandemic.

Years of resource exploitation and lax legislation have allowed most reservoirs in that part of the country to run dry.

"There are now 400,000 families, nearly 1.5 million people approximately, whose supply of 50 liters of water a day depends on tankers," Rodrigo Mundaca, spokesman for the Movement for the Defense of Water, the Earth and the Protection of the Environment, told AFP.

One of the main pieces of advice to protect people against coronavirus is to wash your hands regularly.

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Trump warns of ‘tough week’ ahead — after the United States surpassed 300,000 coronavirus victims

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US President Donald Trump warned Americans on Saturday to brace for a "very horrendous" number of coronavirus deaths in the coming days as the total number of global fatalities from the pandemic soared past 60,000.

As confirmed COVID-19 cases in the United States surpassed 300,000 with more than 8,300 deaths, there was some encouraging news in Italy and Spain.

Europe continues to bear the brunt of the epidemic, however, accounting for over 45,000 of the worldwide deaths, and Britain reported a new daily high in fatalities.

There are now more than 1.17 million confirmed coronavirus cases around the world and there have been 63,437 deaths since the virus emerged in China late last year.

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