Quantcast
Connect with us

‘The man who sold America’: Mitch McConnell’s mountain of political sins catalogued in devastating new profile

Published

on

Mitch McConnell finally has the power he’s longed for since he was a 22-year-old intern for Sen. John Sherman Cooper, but his ruthless march to become Senate majority leader has seen him abandon almost all of his stated principles — and earned him a lot of enemies.

The Kentucky Republican has been unpopular in his home state for years, but this summer has seen his approval rating plunge to 18 percent after MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough tarred and feathered him with the nickname “Moscow Mitch,” and he’s increasingly seen as “the man who sold America,” reported Rolling Stone.

ADVERTISEMENT

“For so many years, McConnell has seemed maddeningly invincible,” wrote Bob Moser in a lengthy magazine profile. “But now, just a few years after achieving his lifelong goal of becoming Senate majority leader, it appears that every political sin the man has committed on his relentless march to power is coming back to haunt him at once.”

“He has welcomed infamy, and now it has arrived on its own terms, bringing with it a previously unthinkable possibility,” he added. “Could 40 years’ worth of devil’s bargains finally be catching up with Mitch McConnell?”

Moser catalogs the Senate majority leader’s political sins, dating back to his swiftly broken campaign promises to back abortion and collective bargaining rights in a 1977 race for Jefferson County judge executive, up to the shady deal earlier this year to lift sanctions on a Russian oligarch whose company Rusal announced a $200 million investment in Kentucky.

“For all the damage he’s inflicted on American democracy, for all the political corpses he’s left in his wake, Mitch McConnell has never betrayed an ounce of shame. To the contrary, like the president he now so faithfully serves, McConnell has always exuded a sense of pride in the lengths to which he’s gone to achieve his ambitions and infuriate his enemies.”

But those machinations seem to be wearing thin with voters, who don’t see how McConnell’s power has translated to any meaningful benefits for their state.

ADVERTISEMENT

“When I was first able to vote, in 1996, I voted for Mitch,” said Jen Thompson, a 47-year-old artist and farmer from Paducah. “He was already getting powerful in Washington, and I bought into the idea that he could do a lot of good for us.”

“But eventually it dawned on me, like a lot of people, this guy really doesn’t give a crap about us,” she added. “He’s all about stockpiling his own squirrel-nut factory for his winter. Public records are public records, and you can see how his trajectory has gone toward wealth. Back home, I’m still making the same amount of money I was making! I think he’s got a real good chance of being booted this time.”

Thompson had come to the annual Fancy Farm picnic where Kentucky politicians hobnob with voters, lob insults at their opponents and brush back hecklers — who drowned out an ashen McConnell with jeers and insults.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I’d say the crowd is pretty evenly divided the way Kentucky is,” said Bennie J. Smith, a civil-rights activist and jazz musician running a long-shot Democratic campaign against McConnell. “Some don’t like him, and some hate him.”


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘Breadth and scale’ of nationwide protests is ‘staggering’: NYU history professor

Published

on

Protests continued to grow in size in cities and towns from coast-to-coast -- and around the world.

"As a historian of social movements in the U.S., I am hard pressed to think of any time in the past when we have had two straight weeks of large-scale protests in hundreds of places, from suburbs to big cities," NYU history Prof. Tom Sugrue posted on Twitter.

"The breadth and scale of #Floyd protests is staggering," he continued.

"We have had some huge one-day demonstrations, e.g. March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom (1963); antinuclear march in NYC (1982), and Women's March (2017). We have widespread, simultaneous protests, such as in the days following MLK, Jr.'s assassination (1968)," he explained. "But the two together--very unusual."

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Incel blew his hand off — and may have been planning for suicide bomber attack on ‘hot’ cheerleaders: report

Published

on

A young man in Virginia was photographed for his mugshot with extensive facial injuries.

"A 23-year-old Virginia man who appeared to be planning an incel bomb attack on "hot cheerleaders" accidentally blew off his hand with explosives, authorities say," BuzzFeed News reported Saturday. "Cole Carini was charged in federal court on Friday connection with the plot after he allegedly lied to FBI agents by saying his extensive injuries were the result of a lawnmower accident."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Big turnout for protest in Texas town known as a ‘haven’ for the Ku Klux Klan

Published

on

Protesters gathered in Vidor, Texas on Saturday for a rally against racism and police violence.

https://twitter.com/JordanJamesTV/status/1269366486189080576

The East Texas town has long had a reputation for racism.

Vidor is a small city of about 11,000 people near the Texas Gulf Coast, not too far from the Louisiana border. Despite the fact that Beaumont, a much bigger city just 10 minutes away, is quite integrated, Vidor is not. There are very few blacks there; it's mostly white. That is in large part because of a history of racism in Vidor, a past that continues to haunt the present," Keith Oppenheim reported for CNN in 2006.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image