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Trump octuples down on hurricane trutherism with another deranged tweet: ‘Four days of corrupt reporting!’

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President Donald Trump simply cannot let his false claims about Hurricane Dorian go.

In an angry Friday morning tweet, the president octupled down on his bogus claim that the hurricane was on track to slam into Alabama as recently as this past Sunday.

“The Fake News Media was fixated on the fact that I properly said, at the beginnings of Hurricane Dorian, that in addition to Florida & other states, Alabama may also be grazed or hit,” the president wrote. “They went Crazy, hoping against hope that I made a mistake (which I didn’t).”

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The president then proceeded to accuse media outlets who accurately reported on his incorrect statements of being “corrupt.”

“This nonsense has never happened to another President,” the president complained. “Four days of corrupt reporting, still without an apology.”

CNN’s Daniel Dale and Brandon Miller have written a thorough fact check showing that the president’s claims are simply false.

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Among other things, the president didn’t merely say that Alabama “may also be grazed or hit” on Sunday — rather, he wrote that “Alabama will most likely be hit (much) harder than anticipated.”

Additionally, weather forecasts at that time definitively showed that the hurricane was not headed toward the Gulf Coast and was instead headed up the eastern seaboard.

“But current NOAA forecasts at the time of Trump’s tweet showed the storm not impacting the state at all, since it was moving north instead of west,” Dale and Miller note.

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Read CNN’s entire debunking of the president’s false claims on Hurricane Dorian at this link.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
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Louisiana pastor grilled on CNN for plan to pack 27 buses full of worshipers and haul them to church during COVID-19 crisis

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A Louisiana pastor was put on the spot on Sunday morning by CNN's Victor Blackwell for his plan to load up his buses and haul worshipers to his planned Sunday service at a time when the highly-c0ntagious COVID-19 pandemic has claimed thousands of lives throughout the country.

Speaking with the CNN host, Life Tabernacle Church pastor Tony Spell said he was ignoring advice from local officials to not host the service because it would endanger the health of his followers.

Asked whether he planned to go forward despite warnings, the pastor replied, "This morning, yes, sir, 10:00 AM. We will actually run our buses. We have 27 buses that we cover in a 50-mile radius of our city. We bring people into the house of God, feed them natural food and spiritual food and then we go right back into our respective places. It takes us about eight hours to run into service on Sunday morning and then we come back in tonight."

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Trump brutally fact-checked by CNN host for lying and blame-shifting about shortages of US pandemic supplies

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The morning after Donald Trump held yet another coronavirus press conference where he said that the country is about to enter into a week with a sharp increase in COVID-19 deaths, CNN's Victor Blackwell brutally dissected the president's lies that the government is helpless because of a shortage of medical supplies because former President Barack Obama left the shelves bare.

Using clips of the president's ever-evolving excuses and contradictions, the CNN host took apart Trump's blame-spreading.

"This morning, a fact check," the CNN host began. "Hospitals across the country are desperate to find the gowns and the gloves and the face shields. And some states have received millions of pieces of that personal protective equipment and the N95 masks from the federal government, but now President Trump says that the strategic national stockpile is nearly depleted of those supplies."

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Trump faces backlash after US tries to take medical supplies intended for other countries: report

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As the coronavirus pandemic continues to inflict misery all around the world, officials in the United States and other countries realize that they will need a plentiful supply of respirators and personal protective equipment (PPE) such as N-95 masks and latex surgical gloves. And the U.S., according to The Guardian, is competing with other countries when it comes to obtaining those items.An article published in The Guardian on Friday and written by four different reporters (Orée-de-Puisaye, Oliver Holmes, Bethan McKernan and Lorenzo Tondo) describes the type of competition taking place. At an airport in Shanghai, China, for example, some masks were about to be shipped to France — a country that has been hit hard by the pandemic (John Hopkins University in Baltimore reported more than 5300 coronavirus-related deaths in France, as of early Friday afternoon). But according to The Guardian, U.S. buyers showed up and offered three times what France had offered to pay for the masks.French politician Jean Rottner, president of the Regional Council of Grand Est, told The Guardian, "On the tarmac, they arrive, get the cash out.… So, we really have to fight." And Rénaud Muselier, another French official, told France's BMFTV, "The icing on the cake: there is a foreign country that paid three times the price of the cargo on the tarmac."
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