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White House staff in a panic as Rudy Giuliani rambles on without warning them first

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White House staffers are struggling to deal with Rudy Giuliani who goes on cable news shows without warning them or checking his talking points with them first. Giuliani’s erratic behavior and keen ability to confess to questionable activities on live television, which tends to throw the communications team for a loop, MSNBC panelists revealed Sunday.

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Over the weekend Giuliani went to bat for the president on a days-long cable news tour. Giuliani was an unpaid lawyer on Trump’s legal team through the special counsel’s investigation. There’s no evidence Giuliani ever was paid anything by the Trump campaign. While Giuliani was doing international work at President Donald Trump’s request, Giuliani is not registered as a foreign agent. It’s unknown who is paying Giuliani for advising Trump.

“The president likes Giuliani, but not a lot of other people seem to,” noted Politico White House correspondent Anita Kumar. “They do not like that he is talking about different things — talking about them where they don’t get a chance to sort of know what that is. One thing important to say here, Rudy Giuliani doesn’t run his interview schedule or his TV appearances by the White House or the campaign. So, he is doing what he wants to do. I don’t think that will change unless President Trump tells him not to do that. So, a lot of these cabinet officials, are taken by surprise — they don’t know that he is going on TV and they don’t know what he is going to say.”

She said that the attorney general has been “very upset” to see he was lumped into this scandal. He went so far as to say that he was unaware of any interactions with the Ukraine scandal. In a call to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, Trump told him to work with Giuliani and Attorney General Bill Barr on the “corruption” problem.

Watch her full comments below:

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Google tightens political ads policy in effort to stop abuse

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Google on Wednesday updated how it handles political ads as online platforms remain under pressure to avoid being used to spread misleading information intended to influence voters.

The internet company said its rules already ban any advertiser, including those with political messages, from lying in ads. But it is making its policy more clear and adding examples of how that prohibits content such as doctored or manipulated images or video.

"It's against our policies for any advertiser to make a false claim -- whether it's a claim about the price of a chair or a claim that you can vote by text message, that election day is postponed, or that a candidate has died," Google ads product management vice president Scott Spencer said in an online post.

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Pope Francis begins Asia tour with visit to Buddhist temple

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Pope Francis will visit one of Thailand's famed gilded temples Thursday to meet the supreme Buddhist patriarch, on the first full day of his Asian tour aimed at promoting religious harmony.

The 82-year-old pontiff is on his first visit to Buddhist majority Thailand, where he will spend four days before setting off to Japan.

His packed schedule a day after touching down in Bangkok includes a meeting with the king and the prime minister before leading an evening mass expected to draw tens of thousands of people from across Thailand, where just over 0.5 percent of the population is Catholic.

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Hong Kong campus stalemate persists while US congress passes bill of support for democracy protesters

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Hardline Hong Kong protesters held their ground on Thursday in a university besieged for days by police as the US passed a bill lauding the city's pro-democracy movement, setting up a likely clash between Washington and Beijing.

Beijing did not immediately respond to the passage in Washington of the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act, which voices strong support for the "democratic aspirations of the Hong Kong people."

But China had already threatened retaliation if the bill is signed into law by President Donald Trump, and state-run media warned Thursday the legislation would not prevent Beijing from intervening forcefully to stop the "mess" gripping the financial hub.

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