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‘Looks like the smoking gun’: Meghan McCain less skeptical of impeachment after Bill Taylor testimony

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Meghan McCain gave her strongest indication yet that President Donald Trump was doomed to impeachment, but she was in no mood to talk about it on her birthday.

The conservative host of “The View” turned 35 on Wednesday, a day after former Ukraine ambassador told lawmakers that President Donald Trump had directed efforts to freeze military aid to pressure the foreign ally to investigate political rival Joe Biden.

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“This is just killing my vibe,” McCain said. “I’m sorry, it’s very bad.”

“Look, I can’t — I just can’t today,” McCain said. “I’m so sorry. I would love to stay on this, but it’s really bad. It looks like it’s highly unethical, and it looks like the smoking gun. That’s my political analysis for today. It’s my 35th birthday, and I want to move on.”

The show celebrates the co-hosts’ birthdays with video greetings from celebrities — in McCain’s case, former House Speaker Paul Ryan — and musical guests, with country singer Shooter Jennings performing for McCain at the end of the episode.

“I’m not going to let Trump ruin my birthday,” she said.

McCain said the Trump presidency felt like a bizarre nightmare from which she couldn’t wake up.

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“I feel like it’s this portal I fell into and somehow and dragged all of you with me, and we’re on Earth 2, and on Earth 1, Paul Ryan’s president,” she said, “and, like, it’s just — it feels — it’s so hard to disassociate between — it does seem like something out of a movie or a TV show, and it’s so hard to watch people I have respected for so long sell their souls on national television for the price of admission into the White House for however much longer this administration lasts.”

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DOJ argues Congress can’t stop Trump Org from taking foreign payments — despite Constitution’s emoluments clause

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The so-called emoluments clause has been the center of a case that many legal scholars have been making that President Donald Trump is regularly violating the Constitution by continuing to accept payments from foreign governments via his businesses.

The Washington Post reports that an attorney from the Trump Department of Justice argued on Monday that the emoluments clause doesn't actually prevent Trump from accepting payments from foreign governments, even though the clause specifically states that "no person holding any office of profit or trust under them, shall, without the consent of the Congress, accept of any present, emolument, office, or title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State."

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Trump unleashes yet another maddening scandal as he opens the door to Saudi Arabian interference

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I don’t often talk about how mad I am. I don’t often talk about how mad I am, because talking often about how mad I am prevents me from speaking clearly and rationally. I want to speak clearly and rationally. There is so much need for speaking clearly and rationally amid the endless streams of waste and filth polluting our public discourse.

This article was originally published at The Editorial Board

But I can’t speak clearly and rationally at the expense of morality. Morality often begins with a feeling. The Gospels tell us of Jesus looking on the poor—he could hear and smell their misery—and he was “moved with pity.” But another way of putting it, another way of translating ?????????????, is that the rabbi felt compassion “in his guts.

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US Supreme Court lets stand Kentucky law with abortion restrictions

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The US Supreme Court on Monday let stand a Kentucky law that requires doctors to make patients seeking an abortion look at fetal images taken by echocardiogram and to listen to their heartbeat.

Without explanation, as is customary, the top US court refused to hear a suit challenging the state law, which was passed in 2017.

The law requires doctors to show patients echocardiogram images of the fetus and describe to them its size and organs and have them listen to its heartbeat if it is detectable, even if the patient objects.

Kentucky's authorities justified the measure as needed to obtain the patient's "informed consent" before proceeding with an abortion.

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