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Rudy Giuliani’s business dealings in Ukraine now under investigation by Congress

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House investigators are seeking records detailing Rudy Giuliani’s business dealings in Ukraine dating back at least a decade.

President Donald Trump’s personal attorney says he has been working for free seeking information from Ukrainian government officials to benefit his client, but House Democrats are expanding their investigation of those efforts to examine Giuliani’s personal dealings there, reported the Washington Post.

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Congressional investigators want records detailing Giuliani’s work for wealthy developer Pavel Fuks, who paid for consulting work the former New York City mayor did in 2017 for the city of Kharkiv.

That same year, according to court documents, Fuks said he was banned from the U.S. for five years, but the documents don’t say why.

House committees are also seeking documents and depositions from two current Giuliani clients, Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman, two Soviet emigres now based in Florida who have been trying to get in on a Ukrainian liquified natural gas venture.

The pair became involved in politics after Parnas donated $50,000 to Trump’s 2016 campaign and a pro-Trump super PAC reported a $325,000 donation last year from a company the two men had incorporated.

House investigators have asked for all documents related to the donations.

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Parnas confirmed Giuliani was an attorney for him and Fruman, who declined comment, but Parnas did not say whether Giuliani was being paid and would not described what work he was doing for them.

Giuliani, whose private security and consulting firm does not disclose its clients, has never registered as a foreign lobbyist, saying his work does not require such filings.

The president’s personal attorney defended his foreign work, saying the identities and interests of his clients are “irrelevant” to his unpaid work for Trump.

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“My other clients are paying me for the work I do for them,” Giuliani said. “Nobody is paying me for a single thing I’m doing for Donald J. Trump.”

National security experts say Giuliani’s dual role presents some clear conflicts.

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“It is problematic that the same person is one day portrayed as a private individual and the next day as someone working on behalf of the U.S. government and the next day working on behalf of Donald Trump personally,” said Michael McFaul, who served as ambassador to Russia during the Obama administration.


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2020 Election

Trump aides frustrated by his ‘nonsensical’ Biden attacks in Ohio: AP reporter

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During a segment on MSNBC's "Morning Joe," Associated Press White House correspondent Jonathan Lemire stated that aides close to President Donald Trump thought the president made some good points about the U.S. economy on Thursday -- only to have his message overlooked when he attacked former Vice President Joe Biden.

Speaking with co-host Willie Geist, Lemire said there were other problems with the Ohio visit -- including Republican Gov. Mike DeWine being unable to attend because he tested positive for COVID-19 -- but Trump stating Biden "hurts God" made the economic points the president made secondary in a state where he needs votes.

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2020 Election

Expert: Trump playing ‘whack-a-mole’ in attempt to salvage states he should be winning

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A top political analyst says President Donald Trump seems to be flying blind as he heads toward an electoral loss.

Dave Wasserman, the U.S. House editor for the Cook Report, told MSNBC's "Morning Joe" that demographic changes had turned formerly reliable red states into competitive congressional races, and that same dynamic had made Trump's re-election campaign even more challenging.

"Pennsylvania, Florida and North Carolina, if you talk to the Trump data people they'll hang their hat on the gap getting narrower in those states," Wasserman said. "What's happening is that a lot of the older voters who, for lack of a better term, are exiting the electorate. They are disproportionally registered Democrats who are conservative and voted for Trump in 2016. Yes, the registration gap is narrowing, fewer voters are registering to vote this year than did in 2016 because we're in a pandemic. That doesn't mean the states are getting more favorable to Trump."

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US COVID death toll projected to hit almost 300,000 by December

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An influential novel coronavirus pandemic model now projects that deaths from the disease in the United States could hit almost 300,000 by the start of December.

NPR reports that researchers at the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation say that the United States is headed toward a grim fall in which COVID-19 deaths will nearly double from their current level of 160,000 in the next four months.

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