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Jim Jordan shot himself in the foot with his key argument for Trump’s innocence: Ex-Mueller prosecutor

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Former prosecutor Andrew Weissmann explained why Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH)jo is stuck making terrible arguments without any of the facts on his side.

His example was Jordan and the GOP hammering home the idea that none of the people appearing before Congress were people who had first-hand information about the inner workings of the presidents of the U.S. and Ukraine.

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The problem with the argument is that those with first-hand information have been barred by Trump from appearing.

“I think that a lot of good defense lawyers, you do what you can with — if you don’t really have great facts,” Weissmann explained. “That sounds good, and it is really not a great argument when you have blocked the people with first-hand information from coming in and testifying, and you’ve blocked documents from coming in to say, ‘Gee, you only have secondhand information.’ And it also leaves aside that the president is actually on a call, and that is first-hand information. That is known as an admission.”

At the same time, a bombshell from Wednesday’s hearings is that the day after the July 25th call, on the 26th, Trump was still thinking about his proposal made the day before.

Ambassador Bill Taylor revealed in his testimony under oath that someone is appearing behind closed doors Friday who has first-hand knowledge of a conversation with Trump about Ukraine on the 26th.

“It also means that you’re going to hear what it is that the president was thinking about. In other words, if he was just thinking this was just a favor, but I didn’t really mean it; presumably, you’re going to hear that,” said Weissmann. “I also — the reports are the president today has said that he does not recall that conversation. That is going to make it pretty important because you’re going to have [Ambassador Gordon] Sondland presumably testifying about it. You’re going to have the staffer testifying about it, and you have the president on record saying I don’t recall it. So how is he going to deny it if the evidence comes out that is actually damning?”

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Jordan was also humiliated by a fellow member saying he would love President Donald Trump to testify.

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Democrats face critical decision on adding new charges to articles of impeachment

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House Democrats are divided over whether to add special counsel Robert Mueller's evidence to the impeachment process.

The House Judiciary Committee on Monday will hear evidence turned up during testimony from the impeachment inquiry focusing on President Donald Trump's efforts to pressure Ukraine into investigating Joe Biden, but some Democrats want to expand the process to include the Russia investigation, reported The Daily Beast.

“This office has been abused and damaged in profound ways,” said Rep. Jared Huffman (D-CA). “I personally would be for holding him accountable for every bit of it. Not for every grievance we have — I wouldn't include his bad behavior or his offensive rhetoric — but some specific actions that I believe that have abused authority and rise to the level of impeachable offense, in my view, would go well beyond the current Ukraine scandal.”

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Trump aides facing jail time counting on pardons as president faces impeachment: report

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According to a report from Politico, former Trump aides facing jail time -- or already in jail -- are using every means possible to get President Donald Trump to issue a blanket pardon before he faces impeachment in the Senate.

The report notes that advocates for former campaign manager Paul Manafort, security adviser Michale Flynn, and Trump supporter Roger Stone are fanning out to right-wing outlets such as Fox News to get the president's attention.

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What would Russia prefer to happen in the UK election?

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The UK election comes against the background of one of the worst periods in Russian-British relations since the end of the Cold War. Badly shaken by the 2006 poisoning of the former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko in London, relations spiralled further down in the aftermath of Russia’s annexation of Crimea in 2014. The poisoning of another former spy, Sergei Skripal, in March 2018 in Salisbury then killed off any hopes of a recovery in bilateral relations.

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