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Here are 5 key takeaways from the House Judiciary Committee’s impeachment report

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The 658-page impeachment report finds that President Donald Trump committed multiple federal crimes and “betrayed the national interest.”

The House Judiciary Committee published the full report early Monday, ahead of a vote likely this week, and laid out the case that Trump had abused his power and obstructed Congress in its oversight role, reported Axios.

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Here are five key takeaways from the report.

1. “President Trump’s abuse of power encompassed both the constitutional offense of ‘Bribery’ and multiple federal crimes,” the report states. “He has betrayed the national interest, the people of this Nation, and should not be permitted to be above the law. It is therefore all the more vital that he be removed from office.”

2. The report found that Trump acted directly and indirectly to “corruptly” solicit Ukraine’s government to announce investigations into Joe Biden and “discredited theory promoted by Russia” that Ukraine, rather than Kremlin agents, had interfered in the 2016 election.

3. “Taken together, the articles charge that President Trump has placed his personal, political interests above our national security, our free and fair elections and our systems of checks and balances,” the report says.

4. The report also alleges that Trump engaged in further wrongdoing even as the impeachment inquiry was presented in public hearings.

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“President Trump also attempted to muzzle witnesses, threatening to damage their careers if they agreed to testify, and even attacked one witness during her live testimony before Congress,” the report notes.

5. “While there is no need for a crime to be proven in order for impeachment to be warranted,” the report adds, “here, President Trump’s scheme or course of conduct also encompassed other offenses, both constitutional and criminal in character, and it is appropriate for the Committee to recognize such offenses in assessing the question of impeachment.”

The report includes arguments from the committee’s Republican minority, which complained the impeachment case was “not only weak” but also “dangerously lowers the bar for future impeachments.”

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Trump and his GOP allies insist he has done nothing wrong.


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‘Not supposed to be that way!’ Bitter Trump whines about Senate possibly letting John Bolton testify

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President Donald Trump on Monday whined about the Senate potentially letting former national security adviser John Bolton testify during his impeachment trial.

"They didn’t want John Bolton and others in the House," the president wrote on Twitter. "They were in too much of a rush. Now they want them all in the Senate. Not supposed to be that way!"

In reality, the House impeachment investigators tried to get Bolton to testify during their inquiry, but he refused to appear unless he got legal clearance to do so. However, Bolton has now offered to testify before the Senate even though he did not comply with House requests to do the same.

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Ex-GOP impeachment manager ripped to shreds on CNN for ‘upside down’ defense of Trump’s conduct

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On CNN Monday, two veterans of the impeachment proceedings against President Bill Clinton clashed over whether President Donald Trump was guilty of impeachable offenses.

"My view is that the phrase that the president's lawyers included in their six-page answer over the weekend is absolutely ironclad, perfectly correct," said Bob Barr, a former House impeachment manager against Clinton. "The language in the Constitution says very clearly that the only basis on which a president can be impeached and removed from office is treason, bribery or other high crimes and misdemeanors. You have to have a crime. And no matter how much rhetoric you put around that to try and get around it, that is a fact, a legal fact, you have to have a crime."

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Donald Trump and Ben Carson are destroying one of MLK’s most enduring legacies

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President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Fair Housing Act just days after the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King -- and President Donald Trump's Housing secretary wants to undo that legacy.

The 1968 law hasn't been able to undo the harm from government-sanctioned housing segregation, which still feeds today's wealth and racial inequality, but the Department of Housing and Urban Development wants to remove a protection for black owners who pay unfairly high property taxes, reported the New York Times.

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