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Here are 5 key takeaways from the House Judiciary Committee’s impeachment report

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The 658-page impeachment report finds that President Donald Trump committed multiple federal crimes and “betrayed the national interest.”

The House Judiciary Committee published the full report early Monday, ahead of a vote likely this week, and laid out the case that Trump had abused his power and obstructed Congress in its oversight role, reported Axios.

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Here are five key takeaways from the report.

1. “President Trump’s abuse of power encompassed both the constitutional offense of ‘Bribery’ and multiple federal crimes,” the report states. “He has betrayed the national interest, the people of this Nation, and should not be permitted to be above the law. It is therefore all the more vital that he be removed from office.”

2. The report found that Trump acted directly and indirectly to “corruptly” solicit Ukraine’s government to announce investigations into Joe Biden and “discredited theory promoted by Russia” that Ukraine, rather than Kremlin agents, had interfered in the 2016 election.

3. “Taken together, the articles charge that President Trump has placed his personal, political interests above our national security, our free and fair elections and our systems of checks and balances,” the report says.

4. The report also alleges that Trump engaged in further wrongdoing even as the impeachment inquiry was presented in public hearings.

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“President Trump also attempted to muzzle witnesses, threatening to damage their careers if they agreed to testify, and even attacked one witness during her live testimony before Congress,” the report notes.

5. “While there is no need for a crime to be proven in order for impeachment to be warranted,” the report adds, “here, President Trump’s scheme or course of conduct also encompassed other offenses, both constitutional and criminal in character, and it is appropriate for the Committee to recognize such offenses in assessing the question of impeachment.”

The report includes arguments from the committee’s Republican minority, which complained the impeachment case was “not only weak” but also “dangerously lowers the bar for future impeachments.”

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Trump and his GOP allies insist he has done nothing wrong.


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MSNBC’s Nicolle Wallace chuckles after Times reporter explains why Trump has no hope of pivoting to an empathetic campaign

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MSNBC host Nicolle Wallace struggled to stifle a chuckle in a conversation about President Donald Trump's struggle to run a campaign that can contend with most Americans' needs in a horrific pandemic.

"I think to Nick [Confessore's] point earlier, there should be a sense of nervousness in Trump's camp," began Democratic strategist Basil Smikle. "You don't see -- you talked about enablers. You don't see Republicans engaged in their behavior with respect to the president at this juncture. You're starting to see them not nationalize he's the president of the United States. They should be more allied with him, but instead, they're focused on local campaigns. The president has lost several cases at the Supreme Court, the Affordable Care Act case notwithstanding. There's a lot of things they should be rallying around, but they can't."

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Here’s how bad things are for Trump after the Supreme Court ruling: columnist

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In a piece for Vanity Fair, columnist Eric Lutz addressed the degree to which President Donald Trump is in trouble after the ruling by the Supreme Court on his financial records.

Trump has spent the better part of four years fighting any transparency about his finances and taxes, which many have suspected might reveal illegal activity.

"He's not going to release his tax returns," said senior adviser Kellyanne Conway in 2017. "We litigated this all through the election. People didn't care."

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Trump gets advice from golfing buddies and right-wing Twitter as America faces a ‘crisis of truth’: op-ed

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Writing in the Washington Post this Thursday, columnist Michael Gerson contends that President Trump is running the country through the prism of the "right-wing information bubble."

"Trump is not only using this right-wing information bubble to exploit his supporters," Gerson writes. "He also seems, increasingly, to have taken up residence there. As his failures have multiplied, his hold on political reality has loosened. Trump has become our boy in the bubble, with an intellectual immune system too weak for him to survive exposure to reality."

All sources of dissent and critical thinking have been removed systematically removed from his administration -- — posts formerly held by Rex Tillerson, James Mattis and Dan Coats, have now been replaced by sycophants, according to Gerson.

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