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World leaders will avoid Trump at NATO meeting because they have seen the ‘damage he has done’: MSNBC panel

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An MSNBC panel on Sunday morning dug into Donald Trump’s visit to the UK, scheduled to begin on Monday, saying all indications are that NATO leaders — including British Prime Minister Boris Johnson — are not looking forward to being seen with the U.S. president due to the risk of damaging their own reputations.

Speaking with host David Gura, former White House aide Ned Price said Johnson’s biggest worry is keeping Trump from saying anything untoward during his visit — including endorsing him before an election scheduled for December 12.

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“NATO is facing internal challenges, challenges that are coming from the president of the United States,” Price explained. “Focus on defense spending of the allies instead of the emerging threats that NATO has to be attuned to, including the rise of China, Russia, which of course has shown aggression in recent days.”

“I think what Prime Minister Johnson will be focused on, first and foremost, is keeping President Trump on script,” he continued. “And by on script, that probably means not offering an endorsement or kind words for Boris Johnson himself. There’s nothing that probably frightens the prime minister more than kind words from President Trump about 10 days before a general election in the U.K.”

“Boris Johnson has tried to keep his distance from Trump,” MSNBC’s Beth Fouhy agreed. “Even though Trump is open in terms of how much he likes him and how they have a common bond. In order to hold this country together, to keep it on the path he wants it on, [Johnson] cannot look like he is Donald Trump’s mini-me over in England. He needs to stand on his own two feet and it is smart that he is keeping this distance.”

FAQ podcast host Christina Greer, elaborated on that point.

“As we have seen as he goes around the world, he is usually the kid sitting at the table himself while other people are gladhanding and politicking and having real discussions,” she remarked. “He will most likely do what he does every time he is abroad, which is sit in his hotel room and watch Fox News and tweet about it. That is traditionally what he has done when he’s abroad.”

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“When the president tries to flex his political muscles with all the other leaders there, we are seeing our allies move away from him,” she continued. “We’ve seen Merkel, she is at her wit’s end with this particular president. He doesn’t really have friends, confidantes, people to have side conversations because they see the damage he has already done.”

Watch below:

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Trump announces Rudy Giuliani ‘wants to go before Congress’ and testify about his Ukraine dealings

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President Donald Trump on Saturday said that his personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, wanted to testify before Congress.

Speaking to reporters as he departed for a Republican fundraiser in Florida, Trump praised the former New York City mayor.

"Rudy, as you know, has been one of the great crime fighters of the last 50 years," Trump said of his lawyer, who is reportedly under federal investigation for breaking the law.

"And, he did get back from Europe just recently and I know -- he has not told me what he found, but I think he wants to go before Congress and say, and also to the attorney general and the Department of Justice," Trump said.

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GOP governors are refusing to do Trump’s bidding and ducking him on the campaign trail: report

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On Saturday, Maggie Haberman of The New York Times profiled how President Donald Trump is having less luck whipping Republican governors into line than Republican senators, including governors who arguably owe their election to his support.

"In Florida, Mr. Trump’s aides helped save the flailing candidacy of Ron DeSantis in the 2018 Republican primary, and then the general election," wrote Haberman. "Also last year, in Georgia, Mr. Trump helped pull Brian Kemp over the finish line in both the primary and the general election. In both cases, Mr. Trump’s advisers implored him to stay out of the primaries, and he agreed to — only to surprise his aides by jumping in to support Mr. DeSantis and Mr. Kemp."

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Courts have avoided refereeing between Congress and the president — Trump may change all that

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President Donald Trump’s refusal to hand over records to Congress and allow executive branch employees to provide information and testimony to Congress during the impeachment battle is the strongest test yet of legal principles that over the past 200 years have not yet been fully defined by U.S. courts.

It’s not the first test: Struggles over power among the political branches predate our Constitution. The framers chose not to, and probably could not, fully resolve them.

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