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‘A trifecta of untruth’: CNN fact checker busts Trump lawyers for multiple impeachment trial lies

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President Donald Trump’s attorneys made multiple false claims during Tuesday’s impeachment trial, and CNN fact checker Daniel Dale was on top of all of them.

During a Wednesday morning segment with CNN’s John Berman, Dale dissected and exposed the multiple untruths spouted by the president’s legal team made during the opening of the impeachment trial that included frequently debunked claims about the impeachment process that took place in the House of Representatives.

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First, Dale tore apart the lie that no Republicans were allowed to take part in or ask questions during the initial closed-door hearings conducted at the start of the impeachment inquiry.

“Every Republican member of the three committees that were holding those closed door hearings — that’s Intelligence, Oversight, Foreign Affairs — was not only allowed to be in the room, but given equal questioning time,” Dale said.

Dale then took a hammer to attorney Jay Sekulow’s claims that Trump “was denied the right to cross-examine witnesses… denied the right to access evidence, and… denied the right to have counsel present at hearings.”

“The president was allowed to have his counsel present at the Judiciary Committee,” Dale said. “In fact, Chairman Nadler actually invited him to have his counsel not only be present, but participate.”

Berman described Sekulow’s argument as “a trifecta of untruth.”

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Watch the video below.

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‘That’s how authoritarian countries work’: CNN’s Toobin warns Trump is acting like a dictator

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On CNN Wednesday, legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin broke down the significance of President Donald Trump's decision to pardon several high-powered friends accused of political corruption and tax crimes.

"There is no doubt, under the Constitution, the president has the power to do this," said Toobin. "This is not legally a — an open question. And there is a history of controversial pardons, whether it's President Clinton pardoning Marc Rich, a fugitive financier, or George Herbert Walker Bush pardoning the Iran-Contra people on his way out of the office."

"So what makes this so troubling is in the middle of his term, here he is assigning friends, basically friends and friends of friends, to get pardons and clemency, which is how authoritarians behave, which is playing favorites with your personal friends at a time when you are playing with the opposite of favorites with prosecutorial decisions," said Toobin. "I want these people prosecuted, these people freed — that's how authoritarian countries work. Countries where there is the rule of law, there are systems in place for who gets prosecuted, who gets clemency. This is a very individually-focused way to run a presidency."

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GOP’s portrayal of Trump as a corruption fighter torn to shreds as ‘complete nonsense’

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Republicans who defended President Donald Trump during impeachment hearings insisted that he wasn't trying to shake down the Ukrainian government to investigate his political foes, but was instead sincerely concerned about fighting corruption abroad.

CNN's John Avlon, however, argued on Wednesday that Trump showed these claims were "complete nonsense" after he unleashed a slew of pardons and commutations for corrupt former public officials, including former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich and NYPD Commissioner Bernard Kerik, who both were sent to prison after being found guilty of abusing their offices for personal gain.

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2020 Election

Pete Buttigieg answers those who question his family values: ‘I’ve never had to pay off a porn star’

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Mayor Pete Buttigieg appeared on CNN Tuesday for a town hall in Nevada where he was asked about his sexual orientation. Thus far, Buttigieg is the first openly gay presidential candidate being taken seriously by both the media and the electorate.

He was asked by a voter how he would deal with the flood of personal attacks on his sexual orientation and his family.

He explained that it would happen and he was ready for it. Speaking about his coming-out story, Buttigieg said that he wasn't sure what impact it would have on his career but that he didn't want to not have a personal life anymore after he got out of the military.

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