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‘Extreme privilege’: Ivanka Trump’s speech at tech conference infuriates participants

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Ivanka Trump’s appearance at a major technology conference infuriated industry figures before and after she spoke.

Women tech leaders said ahead of the CES gathering in Las Vegas that they were “insulted” by Trump’s invitation, and her speech angered attendees, reported The Guardian.

“Ivanka is not a woman in tech,” said Brianna Wu, a video game developer who is running for Congress in Massachusetts. “She’s not a CEO. She has no background. It’s a lazy attempt to emulate diversity but like all emulation it’s not quite the real thing.”

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The president’s eldest daughter and senior White House adviser spoke Tuesday afternoon in a keynote session at SEC about the “the path to the future of work.”

“Our current and future workforce rely on the efforts of industry, academia and government to fill our workforce needs and I’m excited to discuss how the Trump administration is championing these shared goals,” Trump said in a statement issued by the White House.

Trump touted her father’s record on employment and claimed “every American who wants to work can secure employment,” with 7 million U.S. job openings — but tech experts were baffled by her invitation.

“There are many more women who are in tech and are entrepreneurs who could run circles around Trump on how technology will impact the future of work,” wrote tech analyst Carolina Milanesi for Forbes.

Investor Elisabeth Fullerton was also angered by Trump’s participation.

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“This is an insult to women in technology,” Fullerton said. “We did hard times in university, engineering, math, and applied sciences. This is what extreme privilege and entitlement get you. It’s not what you know it’s who you know I guess.”


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2020 Election

Justice Ginsburg sends out dire warning about the new Supreme Court ruling in Wisconsin election case

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Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg issued a disturbing dissent on Monday as the conservative majority of the U.S. Supreme Court intervened in Tuesday’s upcoming Wisconsin election with a move she warned could result in “massive disenfranchisement.”

The election, which includes the Democratic presidential primary, a Wisconsin Supreme Court race, and a raft of other local campaigns, has become embroiled in controversy as observers warn the coronavirus pandemic threatens the safety and integrity of the election. While Democratic Gov. Tony Evers has pushed to delay the election until June in light of the pandemic, the Republican-dominated legislature has refused to act, apparently believing the chaos caused by the crisis will depress turnout and benefit the GOP.

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Boeing is no longer manufacturing airplanes after closing its last factory ‘until further notice’: report

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Boeing announced Monday it is suspending production of its 787 Dreamliner aircraft "until further notice" due to the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on workers and suppliers.

Shuttering the South Carolina plant on Wednesday halts production at the last of the aviation giant's US commercial aircraft facilities.

Boeing, which employs more than 161,000 people, the vast majority in the United States, already suspended activity indefinitely at its factories in Washington state.

The company had been struggling with the grounding of its 737 MAX aircraft after two deadly crashes when the COVID-19 outbreak hit, halting most air travel worldwide and leading some airlines to cancel orders for new aircraft.

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Trump is ‘unethical and tyrannical’ for firing inspector general who relayed Ukraine complaint: Conservative columnist

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On Monday, writing for the Washington Examiner, conservative columnist Quin Hillyer laid into President Donald Trump for getting rid of intelligence community inspector general Michael Atkinson.

Hillyer pointed out that the GOP and some Democrats "rightly expressed outrage" when President Barack Obama fired Gerald Walpin, the AmeriCorps inspector general who Obama had claimed was "confused and disoriented" in meetings and took unauthorized absences from work. But "Trump has even less reason to fire Atkinson now than Obama had to fire Walpin then."

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