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MSNBC’s Morning Joe uncorks hilarious rant against ‘confederacy of dunces’ defending Trump from impeachment

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MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough breathlessly ranted, as his co-hosts cracked up with laughter, against the “confederacy of dunces” defending President Donald Trump from impeachment.

The “Morning Joe” host mocked the hours-long parade of attorneys — including Alan Dershowitz, Ken Starr and Pam Bondi — offering specious legal arguments to defend the president at his Senate impeachment trial.

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“You had a confederacy of dunces defending him in impeachment,” Scarborough said. “Their arguments were absolutely stunning.”

The defense team painted Rudy Giuliani as a minor player in the Ukraine scheme, although multiple witnesses have described him as the hub of the operation, and Starr, the lead investigator in Bill Clinton’s impeachment, bemoaned the “age of impeachment.”

“If irony weren’t already dead and buried years ago, it was Ken Starr yesterday talking about how abuse of power is not sufficient to impeach a president, you need a crime,” Scarborough said. “He literally dragged the corpse of irony out of the grave, he meticulously tied the corpse’s neck bone to the back of a tractor, and he ran that tractor throughout the graveyard of stupidity and ran over every headstone. This, before once again kicking dirt on the corpse of irony, again.”

“These people lowered the collective I.Q. not only of America, but of the western world, by at least 24 points every hour they spoke on the Senate floor,” he concluded.

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2020 Election

Trump blasted as ‘pathological liar’ for claiming stock market is ‘starting to look very good’ after 1,000 point crash

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The COVID-19 coronavirus epidemic spreading across the world has present challenges for President Donald Trump.

In addition to the public health challenge facing the administration, Trump's 2020 reelection campaign is also faced with an economic crisis as the virus disrupts global supply chains.

"Investors around the world retreated from stocks and piled into haven assets including government bonds and gold, reflecting escalating worries that the coronavirus will disrupt the global economy," The Wall Street Journal reported Monday. "The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped more than 1,000 points—its biggest point decline in more than two years; the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note approached a record low; and gold prices climbed for the eighth straight session to a seven-year high."

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2020 Election

Here are 11 of the most popular progressive policies for candidates to run on — and 5 of the least popular

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New polling from the progressive pollster Data for Progress, described in a new piece Monday at Vox, points the way forward for Democrats looking to oust President Donald Trump from the White House and enact a liberal policy agenda.

Progressives often argue that their plans are broadly popular with Americans, and that these ideas are only prevented from becoming reality because of an obstinate Republican Party weaponizing racism and misinformation, archaic political institutions that stymie significant efforts at reform, and corruption across the two parties that allows special and corporate interests to undermine the popular will. And there is a fair amount of truth in this idea — some progressive idea are remarkably popular, and there's no good reason they haven't been implemented yet.

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US economy faces long-lasting damage from Trump’s trade war: fed official

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The trade conflict of the past two years likely left a mark on the US economy, even with the recent agreement to defuse the situation, a Federal Reserve official said Monday.

The outbreak of the new coronavirus in China adds another risk factor to the outlook, which otherwise seemed poised to provide steady growth, said Loretta Mester, president of the Federal Reserve's regional bank in Cleveland.

"At this point, it is difficult to assess the magnitude of the economic effects, but this new source of uncertainty is something I will be carefully monitoring," she said of the epidemic.

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