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The View’s Meghan McCain writes off John Bolton impeachment bombshells: ‘The title of his book is stupid’

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“The View” co-host Meghan McCain ignored John Bolton’s claims about President Donald Trump and instead focused on his forthcoming book’s title.

The conservative co-host said she didn’t trust Bolton, the former national security adviser, and questioned his motives in revealing that Trump had explicitly tied Ukraine aid to an investigation of Joe Biden — which forms the basis of the impeachment case.

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“I think the title of his book is stupid,” McCain said.

Bolton’s book, “In The Room Where It Happened,” makes an apparent reference to a song from the musical “Hamilton,” she said.

“I think Lin-Manuel Miranda should get money for him copying his title,” McCain said. “Look, it seems very interesting that he’s monetizing this so quickly that the moment it leaks, the web page where you can buy his book goes up immediately, on Amazon. His publishers put it up.”

“I don’t know what’s happening here,” she added. “I don’t believe that someone like Ambassador Bolton, who’s a political animal for many, many administrations, automatically wakes up and has a conscience. I’ve said that on the show before. I don’t believe it.”

Co-host Joy Behar quickly pushed back.

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“I don’t agree with that,” Behar said. “I think he’s doing it because he’s pissed.”

The new revelations could change the course of the impeachment trial, she added.

“(Sen. Mitt) Romney is now saying that he will go for the witnesses,” Behar said, “and (Sen.) Susan Collins — we can’t trust as far as we could throw her — has said ‘I’ve always said that I was likely to vote to call witnesses, just as I did in the 1999 Clinton trial. The report about John Bolton’s book strengthened the case for witnesses and have prompted a number of conversations among my colleagues.’ You know, it’s not quite there but they seem to be moving in that direction.”

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Walkouts as Roman Polanski wins best director at French Oscars

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Roman Polanski won best director for "An Officer and a Spy" at a fractious ceremony for the French Oscars, the Cesars, that ended in walkouts and recrimination in Paris early Saturday.

The entire French academy had been forced to resign earlier this month amid fury that the veteran -- wanted in the US for the statutory rape of a 13-year-old girl in 1977 -- had topped the list of nominations.

Protesters chanting "Lock up Polanski!" tried to storm the theatre where the ceremony was being held before being pushed back by police firing tear gas.

And France's Culture Minister Franck Riester had warned that giving the maker of "Rosemary's Baby" a Cesar would be "symbolically bad given the stance we must take against sexual and sexist violence".

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Trump accuses Democrats of coronavirus ‘hoax’ as confirmed cases in US gather pace

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President Donald Trump accused Democrats of a new “hoax” over criticism of his handling of the coronavirus threat, as US health officials reported Friday a fourth case of novel coronavirus of unknown origin, indicating the disease was spreading in the country.

The latest case is a boy under 18 in Washington State who tested "presumptive positive" and is currently in home isolation in Snohomish County. The high school he attends will be shut until March 3 while it is deep cleaned, the Washington State Department of Health said.

A positive test is treated as "presumptive" until the results have been confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Regulators move to fine telecoms for selling location data

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US regulators moved to impose fines Friday against the nation's four major wireless carriers for selling location data of customers without their consent.

The Federal Communications Commission proposed fining T-Mobile more than $91 million; AT&T some $57 million; Verizon $48 million, and Sprint $12 million.

The wireless firms were accused of having disclosed mobile network user location data to a third party without authorization from customers, the FCC said.

The FCC began an investigation after a report that a sheriff in Missouri used a "location-finding service" operated by a prison communications services company called Securus to track whereabouts of people including a judge and law enforcement officers.

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