Quantcast
Connect with us

‘Bill Barr is un-American’: The AG’s ex-boss explains his ‘twisted’ worldview — and why he must be ousted

Published

on

In a new piece for the Atlantic, a man who once supervised Attorney General Bill Barrpublished an incisive call for the head of the Justice Department to resign while outlining his disturbing view of executive power.

Donald Ayer, the former deputy attorney general under President George H.W. Bush, supervised Barr when he led the department’s Office of Legal Counsel in 1989 and 1990. After Ayer left deputy attorney general position in 1990, Barr replaced him and then became attorney general, a position he returned to in 2019 under President Donald Trump.

ADVERTISEMENT

In light of Ayer’s close connection to Barr, his scathing condemnation hits with even more force.

“In chilling terms, Barr’s own words make clear his long-held belief in the need for a virtually autocratic executive who is not constrained by countervailing powers within our government under the constitutional system of checks and balances,” Ayer wrote. “Indeed, given our national faith and trust in a rule of law no one can subvert, it is not too strong to say that Bill Barr is un-American. And now, from his perch as attorney general, he is in the midst of a root-and-branch attack on the core principles that have guided our justice system, and especially our Department of Justice, since the 1970s.”

To deal with such an attorney general, Ayer argued, the people must demand his resignation. And if he won’t resign, he should be impeached.

Ayer listed the series of events that have made Barr’s critics so vocal, after many had been hopeful about his appointment, including:

  • His “public whitewashing of Robert Mueller’s report”
  • His accusation that the FBI was “spying” on the Trump campaign
  • Trump’s mentioning of Rudy Giuliani and Barr in tandem in his July 25 call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky
  • Barr’s initiation of a “second, largely redundant investigation of the FBI Russia probe”
  • And, “worst of all,” Barr’s intervention in the cases of Roger Stone and Michael Flynn

“The fundamental problem is that he does not believe in the central tenet of our system of government—that no person is above the law,” Ayer wrote.

ADVERTISEMENT

He argued that Barr’s view of the presidency is extremely expansive and virtually fulfills Richard Nixon’s famous claim that “when the president does it, that means that it is not illegal.” But he goes even further, Ayer said, because Barr believes that the president shouldn’t even be significantly constrained by Congress or the courts.

Ayer argued that to get to this view, Barr accepts a warped view of history that misrepresents the intentions of the Constitution’s framers and the constraints previous presidents have dealt with.

“For whatever twisted reasons, he believes that the president should be above the law, and he has as his foil in pursuit of that goal a president who, uniquely in our history, actually aspires to that status. And Barr has acted repeatedly on those beliefs in ways that are more damaging at every turn. Presently he is moving forward with active misuse of the criminal sanction, as one more tool of the president’s personal interests,” Ayer wrote.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Privacy rights may become next victim of killer pandemic

Published

on

Digital surveillance and smartphone technology may prove helpful in containing the coronavirus pandemic -- but some activists fear this could mean lasting harm to privacy and digital rights.

From China to Singapore to Israel, governments have ordered electronic monitoring of their citizens' movements in an effort to limit contagion. In Europe and the United States, technology firms have begun sharing "anonymized" smartphone data to better track the outbreak.

These moves have prompted soul-searching by privacy activists who acknowledge the need for technology to save lives while fretting over the potential for abuse.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards honors staffer who died from COVID-19

Published

on

Gov. John Bel Edwards (D-LA) offered a moving tribute to a member of his staff who died from COVID-19.

"On behalf of the first lady and my entire administration, it is with heavy hearts that we mourn the loss of our dear April, who succumbed to complications from COVID-19," he posted on Twitter, along with photos.

"She brightened everyone’s day with her smile and was an inspiration to everyone who met her," he continued.

"She lived her life to the fullest and improved the lives of countless Louisianans with disabilities as a dedicated staff member in the Governor's Office of Disability Affairs. April worked hard as an advocate for herself & other members of the disability community," he wrote.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Washington state nurses share shocking stories from their war against coronavirus

Published

on

by Ken Armstrong and Vianna Davila

Nurses at one hospital in southeastern Washington state have alleged that, amid the COVID-19 pandemic, they were ordered by supervisors to use one protective mask per shift, potentially exposing themselves to the novel coronavirus.

At another hospital, just east of Seattle, nurses had to use face shields indefinitely.

At a third hospital, on Washington’s border with Oregon, nurses reported that respirators were expired. The hospital responded, the nurses said, by ordering staff to remove stickers showing that the respirators might be as much as three years out of date.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image