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‘Rattled’ Trump rushed to the bunker as protesters surrounded the White House: report

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The New York Times is reporting that President Donald Trump rushed to the bunker as protesters surrounded the White House.

On Friday, as protests continued escalating across the United States, those standing against police brutality and demanding action came to the White House. It was only a few hundred people, far eclipsed by the crowd marching through the streets of Washington, D.C. on Sunday.

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The Secret Service hasn’t said what prompted them to take Trump to the underground bunker on Friday, but there is a protocol to get him to safety if they feel the White House and the president are threatened. The only other notorious use of the bunker was when Vice President Dick Cheney was brought on Sept. 11, 2001, as planes hit the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

It has been designed to withstand the force of a passenger jet crashing into the White House above it.

Trump was reportedly “rattled” and spent the evening in the bunker with his family.

He “emerged on Saturday morning to boast that he never felt unsafe and vow to sic ‘vicious dogs’ and ‘ominous weapons’ on intruders. Melania Trump, anxious about the protests, opted at the last minute not to travel to Florida for the rocket launch on Saturday,” said the Times.

After watching the SpaceX launch on Saturday, protesters approached the White House again. Washington police blocked off roads for several blocks around the White House. Trump then took to Twitter to attack the police for not helping the Secret Service.

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Trump ranted “FAKE NEWS” about 15 minutes after the report went live. It’s unclear if he’s calling the story false or the fact that he was “rattled” is false.

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Former Vice President Joe Biden, by contrast, took to the streets Sunday to listen to the concerns of protesters and spoke on the phone with many mayors in the country.

Read the full New York Times report.

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‘The president isn’t above the law’: Supreme Court expected to rule on two key Trump cases on Thursday

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Can Donald Trump refuse to hand over his financial records to Congress and New York prosecutors simply because he is president of the United States? The Supreme Court will rule Thursday on two related cases to answer this, with potentially widespread political implications.

The decision by the nine justices could lift the veil on Trump's finances ahead of the November 3 election.

Unlike all of his predecessors since Richard Nixon in the 1970s, New York real estate mogul Trump refused to release his tax returns, despite promising to do so during his 2016 White House campaign.

Trump made his fortune a key component of that campaign, and his lack of transparency raises questions about his true worth and possible conflicts of interest.

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2020 Election

Houston convention center operator cancels in-person Texas GOP meeting

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The Republican Party of Texas' in-person convention next week has been canceled, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner said Wednesday.

The news came after Turner directed the city's legal department to work with the Houston First Corp., which operates the George R. Brown Convention Center, to review the contract with the state party.

Turner said officials with Houston First sent a letter this afternoon to the State Republican Executive Committee, the state party's governing board, canceling the gathering, which was set to happen July 16-18 and was expected to draw roughly 6,000 attendees.

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This government official tried to share optimism about vaccines — but he also hinted at a dark possible future

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Dr. Kayvon Modjarrad, the director for Emerging Infectious Diseases at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, joined CNN's Anderson Cooper for a recent TV interview to discuss the ongoing work to create a vaccine for the coronavirus. And in many ways, his remarks brought good news about the development process and progress toward a safe and effective vaccine. But he also hinted at a dark potential future for the virus, a consideration that has not yet received much public discussion.

"I am very optimistic that we will have a vaccine in the near future, a safe vaccine," he said. "How effective that vaccine will be — time will tell. And I don't think there's going to be just one vaccine. There'll be multiple vaccines that we try to get across the finish line, as quickly as possible. And we may need multiple interactions of the vaccine going forward, season to season."

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