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New York prosecutors issue ‘wide-ranging subpoena’ for Trump’s financial documents to Deutsche Bank

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President Donald Trump. (AFP Photo/MANDEL NGAN)

New York prosecutors are showing they’re serious about the look into President Donald Trump’s finances out of concern for fraud.

The New York Times reported Wednesday afternoon that this is part of the year-long legal battle between Trump and the Manhattan district attorney Cy Vance.

A subpoena was previously issued for Trump’s tax returns last year, but Trump fought it all the way to the Supreme Court, where he was told to comply with subpoenas and hand over the documents.

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The subpoena was “more wide-ranging than previously known,” said the Times, noting that it requested financial documents dating back to the 1990s.

“In a court filing this week, prosecutors with the district attorney’s office cited ‘public reports of possibly extensive and protracted criminal conduct at the Trump Organization’ and suggested that they were also investigating possible crimes involving bank and insurance fraud,” said the report.

“Because of its longstanding and multifaceted relationship with Mr. Trump, Deutsche Bank has been a frequent target of regulators and lawmakers digging into the president’s opaque finances,” the Times explained. “But the subpoena from the office of the district attorney, Cyrus R. Vance Jr., appears to be the first instance of a criminal inquiry involving Mr. Trump and his dealings with the German bank, which lent him and his company more than $2 billion over the past two decades.”

It was announced earlier this week that Trump’s personal banker is also under investigation.

Read the full report at the New York Times.

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2020 Election

Sidney Powell’s ‘Kraken’ lawsuit suffers setback as Georgia GOP county chair demands to be removed

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The Republican chair in Cobb County, Georgia said on Thursday that he wanted to be removed from Sidney Powell's election lawsuit because he never gave his consent to be included.

Powell, who was kicked off President Donald Trump's legal team, was criticized this week after she filed a lawsuit in Georgia that was riddled with typos.

Powell had previously promised that the lawsuit would "release the Kraken" in an effort to overturn President-elect Joe Biden's win in Georgia.

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Justice Sotomayor pens scathing dissent to COVID-19 ruling: This ‘will only exacerbate the Nation’s suffering’

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Justice Sonia Sotomayor blasted her more conservative colleagues for barring New York state from reimposing coronavirus restrictions on religious gatherings.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4, in a late-night emergency ruling, that state officials could not reimpose limits on churches and synagogues to prevent the spread of the highly contagious virus, and Sotomayor penned a scathing dissent that was joined by Justice Elena Kagan.

"Amidst a pandemic that has already claimed over a quarter million American lives, the Court today enjoins one of New York’s public health measures aimed at containing the spread of COVID–19 in areas facing the most severe outbreaks," Sotomayor wrote.

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Conservative rips GOP ‘turkeys’ for turning Thanksgiving COVID safety measures into a culture-war fight

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Writing in The Bulwark this Thursday, Tim Miller says that America should be experiencing a time of national solidarity in the midst of a global pandemic. Instead, "we have a president whose focus is entirely on his effort to perpetrate a fraud on the American public."

According to Miller, Republicans are disseminating a narrative that says coronavirus restriction should be met with a sort of "organized resistance" from individuals and businesses that feel unfairly oppressed. While everyone wants to be with their families on Thanksgiving, "one thing that most people have learned by the time they are adults is that they don’t get to do whatever they want whenever they want."

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