Quantcast
Connect with us

Trump could end up at Rikers Island jail by the end of 2023 if he loses re-election: Legal experts

Published

on

(Official White House Photo by Joyce N. Boghosian)

If President Donald Trump loses re-election, he could find himself the first ex-president to be charged with a crime.

More than a dozen investigations are already under way against Trump and his associates, so his potential legal exposure is “breathtaking,” according to New York Magazine columnist Jeff Wise.

“You might think, given all the crimes Trump has bragged about committing during his time in office, that the primary path to prosecuting him would involve the U.S. Justice Department,” Wise wrote. “If Joe Biden is sworn in as president in January, his attorney general will inherit a mountain of criminal evidence against Trump accumulated by Robert Mueller and a host of inspectors general and congressional oversight committees. After the DOJ’s incoming leadership is briefed on any sensitive matters contained in the evidence, federal prosecutors will move forward with their investigations of Trump.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Trump could try to pardon himself on his way out of the White House, which would certainly complicate matters, but Wise believes that Manhattan district attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. would likely charge the president with falsifying business records and tax fraud.

“To build a fraud case against Trump, Vance subpoenaed his financial records,” Wise wrote. “But those records alone won’t be enough: To secure a conviction, Vance will need to convince a jury not only that Trump cheated on his taxes but that he intended to do so.”

Unfortunately for the president, his former attorney Michael Cohen and longtime accountant Allen Weisselberg have already signaled they’re willing to cooperate with prosecutors and both would have strong evidence to prove Trump’s intent.

“Once indicted, Trump would be arraigned at New York Criminal Court, a towering Art Deco building at 100 Centre Street,” Wise wrote. “Since a former president with a Secret Service detail can hardly slip away unnoticed, he would likely not be required to post bail or forfeit his passport while awaiting trial. His legal team, of course, would do everything it could to draw out the proceedings.”

Accounting for those legal delays, experts told Wise that Trump would likely go on trial by 2023 and last no longer than a few months, and the president’s own supporters have already been persuaded to convict former campaign chairman Paul Manafort.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Trump’s conviction would seal the greatest downfall in American politics since Richard Nixon,” Wise wrote. “Unlike his associates who were sentenced to prison on federal charges, Trump would not be eligible for a presidential pardon or commutation, even from himself. And while his lawyers would file every appeal they can think of, none of it would spare Trump the indignity of imprisonment.”

“Unlike the federal court system, which often allows prisoners to remain free during the appeals process, state courts tend to waste no time in carrying out punishment,” he added. “After someone is sentenced in New York City, their next stop is Rikers Island. Once there, as Trump awaited transfer to a state prison, the man who’d treated the presidency like a piggy bank would receive yet another handout at the public expense: a toothbrush and toothpaste, bedding, a towel, and a green plastic cup.”


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

In rural America, resentment over COVID-19 shutdowns is colliding with rising case numbers

Published

on

As COVID-19 spreads through rural America, new infection numbers are rising to peaks not seen during this pandemic and pushing hospitals to their limits. Many towns are experiencing their first major outbreaks, but that doesn’t mean rural communities had previously been spared the devastating impacts of the pandemic.

Infection rates in rural and frontier communities ebbed and flowed during the first seven months, often showing up in pockets linked to meat packing plants, nursing homes or prisons.

Continue Reading

2020 Election

Michigan congresswoman has a ‘voter protection plan’ to keep Trump from stealing the election

Published

on

In Michigan's 8th Congressional District, Democratic Rep. Elissa Slotkin has not only been campaigning for reelection — the former CIA officer has also been sounding the alarm about the possibility voter intimidation and things that President Donald Trump might do to steal the election. And she discusses some of her concerns in an interview with Politico published this week.

Politico's Tim Alberta explains, "(Slotkin) worries that just winning is no longer enough. With the president regularly lobbing allegations of a rigged election — one that he cannot possibly lose fair and square — Slotkin, a former CIA officer, worries that America could be hurtling toward a civil and constitutional crisis. This is not what a vulnerable freshman campaigner is often preoccupied with down the home stretch of their maiden reelection campaign, but Slotkin can think of little else these days."

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

Donald Trump Jr. says COVID death rate is ‘good stuff’ that ‘shouldn’t end your life’

Published

on

Ignoring the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Americans, Donald Trump Jr. argued on Monday that people "shouldn't end your life" due to COVID-19.

The president's son made the remarks at a campaign event in Lake Township, Ohio where he claimed that Democratic nominee Joe Biden would "lock down the country forever."

"If you're susceptible, you take reasonable precautions," he opined. "If you're young and you don't, you've got to live."

"They don't understand that," Trump continued. "They don't talk about the death rate plummeting or any of the good stuff. They just say, 'Well, the infection rate is up.'"

Continue Reading
 
 
Democracy is in peril. Invest in progressive news. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free. LEARN MORE