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‘A country in chaos’: World shocked at how far America has fallen after Trump’s ‘spiteful’ debate

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People fight around a Confederate flag during an extreme-right rally and left-wing counter-demonstration at Stone Mountain, Georgia, on August 15, 2020 Logan Cyrus AFP/File

President Donald Trump’s performance at the first 2020 presidential debate has shocked observers across the world who are lamenting the decline and fall of the United States of America as a world power.

As the Washington Post reports, even right-wing publications such as Switzerland’s Neue Zürcher Zeitung newspaper thought Trump’s performance was symbolic of something deeply wrong with American society.

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“Whoever is looking for an explanation for the shape the United States is currently in will find it in those 90 minutes, that should have been a political debate,” the publication wrote on Wednesday. “Instead, the tradition has degenerated into cheap reality TV. What flickered across TV screens was the image of a country in chaos. The spiteful debate mirrors a country that is no longer even capable of having a dignified discussion.”

Anna Soubry, a former Conservative Party lawmaker in the United Kingdom, called the debate “truly terrible.”

“Whatever our views let’s agree and promise we will never allow British politics to plummet to such a level,” she wrote on Twitter.

And French newspaper Le Monde warned that Trump’s entire presidency is a warning to the rest of the world about how even traditionally stable democracies can degenerate into authoritarianism.

“Four years of Trumpism have largely contributed to weakening one of the greatest democracies in the world,” an editorial in the paper declared. “It’s a lesson for everyone else.”

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2020 Election

Arizona Republican likens Trump’s loss to Japan getting nuked while losing WW II — but as a good thing

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President Donald Trump on Monday allowed President-elect Joe Biden's transition to proceed -- while vowing he would never concede.

Despite Trump losing the election, some Trump supporters are refusing to accept the outcome.

One Arizona Republican in Congress, Paul Gosar, drew upon the historical knowledge him learned on his way to becoming a dentist in a bizarre analogy he posted on Twitter.

Gosar suggested the Trump movement would be like an Imperial Japanese soldier in World War II who refused to surrender until 1974.

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2020 Election

Neal Katyal predicts law schools will teach a ‘Worst Mistakes in Court’ class on Trump’s ‘pathetic’ 20-day fiasco

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Prominent lawyer Neal Katyal is best known for having tried over 40 cases before the United States Supreme Court and serving as acting Solicitor General during the Obama administration.

But he also has spent more than two decades as a law professor at Georgetown.

He drew upon all of that experience for a Monday evening appearance on MSNBC's "The Last Word" with Lawrence O'Donnell.

"Someday a law school class is going to be called 'The Worst Mistakes in Court' -- and it will be just about these 20 days," Katyal predicted. "Because this legal strategy is so pathetic it makes Trump's coronavirus strategy look competent by contrast."

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2020 Election

Trump vows he ‘will never concede’ — in 11 pm conspiracy-filled rant

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Donald Trump lost the 2020 presidential to President-elect Joe Biden, but is still refusing to concede.

White House aides reportedly convinced him to allow Biden to begin his transition by telling him he did not need to use the word "concede."

But that word appeared to be on his mind late Monday night.

"What does GSA being allowed to preliminarily work with the Dems have to do with continuing to pursue our various cases on what will go down as the most corrupt election in American political history?" Trump asked while continuing to lie about the election being corrupt.

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