Quantcast
Connect with us

Phony spy came ‘dangerously close’ to stealing $4 billion from US military — and getting away with it

Published

on

Garrison Courtney (DEA)

A former Drug Enforcement Administration official was about to swindle nearly $4 billion from the military after ripping off $4.4 million from government officials and other victims, according to new court documents.

A sentencing memo filed in federal court by the Department of Justice shows that fake spy Garrison Courtney was “dangerously close” to taking his scam to another level before his cover was blown, reported The Daily Beast.

ADVERTISEMENT

Courtney pleaded guilty this summer to one count of wire fraud as part of a complicated scheme posing as a deep-cover CIA operative after leaving his high-level spokesman position for the DEA.

According to investigators, Courtney convinced defense contractors to put him on the payroll so he could pose as a civilian while he supposedly worked on a top-secret national security mission.

The sentencing memo shows Courtney “seeking to corrupt over $3.7 billion in federal procurements” from defense contractors before investigators disrupted his fraudulent scheme.

“The government had requirements, he knew the requirements, and he was gonna deliver the requirements,” one of Courtney’s conspirators told The Daily Beast. “He only needed a little bit more time, and he actually would have delivered. If left alone, he’d probably be a billionaire right now.”

That person, an ex-military intelligence officer, escaped criminal charges by cooperating with investigators, and he told The Daily Beast that he worked with Courtney at cybersecurity contractor Blue Canopy before taking part in the scheme that ultimately cost his job, life’s savings and marriage.

ADVERTISEMENT

“The FBI agreed not to put my name out there, so I thought I could walk away from this and try to create some semblance of a life,” that individual said. “All I ever wanted to be was an intelligence officer, and I was really good.”

Courtney’s scam was so convincing that it almost became real.

A number of public officials actually tried to stop the FBI investigation on national security grounds, and investigators said Courtney came extremely close to effectively immunizing himself from prosecution by getting his phony mission legitimized under national security law.

ADVERTISEMENT

“It is chilling to consider what the defendant could have accomplished,” the sentencing memo said.

Prosecutors are seeking 37 months in prison for Courtney.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

Trump adviser undermines Republican attacks on Biden’s national security team

Published

on

One of President Donald J. Trump's top advisers has undermined Republican attacks on the incoming Biden administration with talk of a "bipartisan consensus" concerning China, the Washington Examiner reported.

White House national security adviser Robert O’Brien was traveling this week in the Philippines when he said, “We’ve got such a series of unfair and difficult conduct on behalf of the Chinese that there’s a bipartisan consensus in America that we have to stand up to China."

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Judge slaps down Trump ploy to force elderly into nursing homes

Published

on

Team Trump lost a court battle that could have pushed our nation’s low-income elderly, disabled and blind out of their own homes and into deathtrap nursing homes during the pandemic.

A California federal judge called the Trump rule that bars states from withholding part of the paychecks of some home healthcare workers for things like health insurance and voluntary union dues a “legal error.”

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

‘Pay-Per-View’: Critics slam Boston Globe for saying Americans don’t want to see Trump dragged out of the White House

Published

on

"This is a deep, almost surreal misunderstanding of our nation"

The Boston Globe is probably surprised after publishing a piece asking, "What if Trump won't leave the White House?"

On social media the paywalled newspaper tweeted, "Even a nation hooked on drama does not want to see a US president dragged out the front door of the White House on Jan. 20, so we asked experts in the art of persuasion how they go about dislodging the reluctant."

Continue Reading