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Trump superfan proven right in alcohol-related crash: ‘I have a better chance of dying in a car crash than I do from COVID’

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Randal Thom (Facebook)

One of President Donald Trump’s most visible superfans told friends he was more likely to die in car crash than from the coronavirus.

Turns out, he was right, reported the Star Tribune.

Randal Thom, the unofficial ringleader of the “Front Row Joes” who’ve packed into the president’s rallies since 2016, was killed Monday afternoon while returning to his Minnesota home after taking part in a pro-Trump flotilla in Florida’s Jupiter Inlet.

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“Randal always said, ‘I have a better chance of dying in a car crash than I do from COVID,'” said friend Marthamae Kottschade.

She and the 60-year-old Randal Thom had been among a group of about 50 from Minnesota who had attended a celebration of law enforcement officers Oct. 10 on the White House grounds, where the president made his first public appearance after his hospitalization for COVID-19.

“He was our state’s most energetic and present activist,” said Mary Susan Timion, founder of the Minnesota chapter of Trump Women 2020. “We’re really crushed, so we’re taking it really, really hard.”

Timion had set up a GoFundMe account last month to pay for Thom’s travels, but that money will be used for funeral expenses instead.

Kottschade said her friend was driving home from the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport after flying home from Florida, and police said they found evidence of recent alcohol use at the crash scene.

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State police said Thom, who was not wearing a seat belt, was driving south on Highway 169 when he struck a pickup that was also traveling south, and that 67-year-old driver survived and was hospitalized for unspecified injuries.

Thom, who gained international fame for his frequent presence at Trump events, was arrested in January 2019 after scuffling with Elizabeth Warren supporters at one of her Democratic primary events in Storm Lake, Iowa.


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Colorado governor and husband test positive for COVID — and all Broncos QBs are benched amid outbreak

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The COVID-19 pandemic hit Colorado hard on Saturday.

"Colorado Gov. Jared Polis and his husband, Marlon Reis, have tested positive for COVID-19," The Colorado Sun reported Saturday. "The governor’s office says both are asymptomatic and isolating in their home."

The governor and first gentleman aren't the only people testing positive.

This evening I learned that First Gentleman Marlon Reis and I have tested positive for COVID-19. We are both asymptomatic, feeling well, and will continue to isolate at home. pic.twitter.com/Ttzxi72ThC

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‘Trump endangered America’s democracy’: President’s delusion broken down in brutal WaPo analysis

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President Donald Trump's refusal to accept the fact that he lost the 2020 presidential election was the focus of a Washington Post deep-dive published online Saturday night.

The story, by Philip Rucker, Ashley Parker, Josh Dawsey and Amy Gardner, was titled, "20 days of fantasy and failure: Inside Trump’s quest to overturn the election."

"The facts were indisputable: President Trump had lost. But Trump refused to see it that way," the newspaper reported. "Sequestered in the White House and brooding out of public view after his election defeat, rageful and at times delirious in a torrent of private conversations, Trump was, in the telling of one close adviser, like 'Mad King George, muttering, ‘I won. I won. I won.'’"

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Female kicker makes college American football breakthrough

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Vanderbilt University kicker Sarah Fuller made collegiate American football history Saturday as the first woman to play in a "Power Five" contest in the Commodores' 41-0 loss to Missouri.

Fuller, goalkeeper for the school's Southeastern Conference champion women's soccer squad, was given the chance to play on the gridiron after Covid-19 testing left Vanderbilt without a kicker.

"I was really excited to step out on the field and do my thing," Fuller said.

Because Vanderbilt's offensive unit sputtered, her contribution was limited to a single play -- the second-half kickoff. She punched the ball to the Missouri 35-yard line, a tricky low offering compared to the usual deeper kicks, where the Tigers fell upon it.

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