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Legal experts slam Republicans’ ‘insane’ refusal to certify Detroit ballots: ‘This is lawlessness’

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Detroit election workers count absentee ballots at TCF Center on November 4, 2020 (AFP)

On Tuesday, Republican members of the Wayne County Board of Canvassers stunned legal observers by refusing to certify the results in Detroit — a majority-Black city that provided hundreds of thousands of votes for President-elect Joe Biden. The move is intended to force the GOP-controlled Michigan legislature to appoint their own electors who could back Trump in defiance of the popular vote — although several more things would have to happen for that to theoretically be possible.

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Legal experts were quick to condemn the move — and to suggest that it won’t go far.

“The Republican canvassers have no authority to do this,” tweeted Sam Bagenstos, a civil rights attorney who ran for the Michigan Supreme Court in 2018. “They have a duty to certify the results. Now the State Board of Canvassers will have to do their duty for them.”

“Insane,” wrote University of Kentucky law professor Josh Douglas. “There’s literally no evidence of election fraud or other problems with the count. The State Board will have to fulfill their duty.”

CBS election law expert David Becker agreed. “Particularly unsupportable given that this election in Wayne County was the best-run in history, thanks to the partnership between the county and the state, with far fewer problems than 2016, when Trump campaign raised no issues,” he wrote.

Chris Geidner, the director of strategy for the Justice Collaborative, had a blunter perspective: “Trump lost, soundly, but he and his allies want to just steal the election — by ignoring the votes of the election. This is lawlessness. Republicans need to address this, now, or admit that theirs is an irreparably rotted party.”

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2020 Election

Republican’s own standing in Congress now in doubt — did his voter fraud lawsuit backfire?

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A Republican congressman from Pennsylvania has cast doubt on his own legitimacy to serve in Congress with his failed lawsuit attempting to overturn the 2020 election results.

Rep. Mike Kelly (R-PA) attempted to have the courts block certification of the 2020 election results, but his effort was rejected by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Saturday.

"The PA Supreme Court dismisses the case brought by U.S. Rep. Mike Kelly that sought to overturn last year’s law creating no-excuse mail voting and to throw out those mail ballots cast in this election," Philadelphia Inquirer correspondent Jonathan Lai reported Saturday. "This is the case the Commonwealth Court had earlier blocked certification in."

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2020 Election

‘Another win for democracy’: Pennsylvania AG celebrates Trump’s latest loss in court

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Republican efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election continued to be rejected by judges on Saturday.

"The PA Supreme Court dismisses the case brought by U.S. Rep. Mike Kelly that sought to overturn last year’s law creating no-excuse mail voting and to throw out those mail ballots cast in this election," Philadelphia Inquirer correspondent Jonathan Lai reported Saturday. "This is the case the Commonwealth Court had earlier blocked certification in."

Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro celebrated the ruling on Twitter.

"BREAKING: We just notched another win for democracy," Shapiro tweeted, with a red siren emoji.

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2020 Election

What can the left expect from a Biden-Harris administration? Pretty much nothing

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On Nov. 7 of this year, the United States let out a collective roar that rippled across the nation, resonating the crowds of blue-clad people swelling the streets and the squares, and causing buildings to tremble as those inside broke out the champagne and began to dance. The celebrations lasted long into the night. For those few precious moments, it felt as though a curse had been lifted, a nightmare abated. Trumpism had ground itself to a resounding and decisive halt and it seemed that political space on the left, and on the center ground, had finally begun to open again.

This article originally appeared at Salon.

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