Six more Republicans sued over Constitution’s ban on insurrectionists running for office: report
Senator Ron Johnson of Wisconsin speaking at CPAC 2011 in Washington, D.C. (Gage Skidmore/Flickr)

A legal effort to bar politicians who participated in events that led up to the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol from running for reelection is gaining steam after lawsuits were filed suit against three Arizona GOP lawmakers and three from Wisconsin to bar them under the 14th Amendment from running again.

"In three separate candidacy challenges filed in Superior Court in Maricopa County, Ariz., voters and the progressive group, Free Speech for People, targeted Representatives Paul Gosar and Andy Biggs and State Representative Mark Finchem, who is running for Arizona secretary of state with former President Donald J. Trump’s endorsement," The New York Times reports. "A separate action is being pursued by a Democratic-aligned super PAC against Senator Ron Johnson and Representatives Tom Tiffany and Scott Fitzgerald, all Wisconsin Republicans."

The suits allege that the lawmakers are not qualified to run for office due to their support for rioters who stormed the Capitol building that day, making them "insurrectionists" as defined by the Constitution.

The little-known third section of the 14th Amendment declares that “no person shall” hold “any office, civil or military, under the United States, or under any state, who, having previously taken an oath” to “support the Constitution,” had then “engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof.”

Read the full report over at The New York Times.

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