'I am angry!': Elizabeth Warren unleashes in fiery speech against 'extremist' court
Warren rally -- screenshot

"I am angry because the United States Congress can change all of this," Sen. Elizabeth Warren declared with passion Tuesday on Capitol Hill as she responded to news that the right-wing majority on the U.S. Supreme Court has voted in favor of a draft decision that, if finalized, would overturn Roe v. Wade.

Warren's fury was visible as she warned that the damage the high court is preparing to do will fall disproportionately "on the poorest women" and those who are most vulnerable.

"The United States Supreme Court thinks they can impose their extremist views on all the women in this country, and they are wrong," said the Massachusetts Democrat.

"This will fall on the young women who have been abused, who are victims of incest," she added. "This will fall on those who have been raped. This will fall on mothers who are already struggling to work three jobs to be able to support the children they have."

Warren has long advocated for Congress to pass the Women's Health Protection Act (WHPA), which was passed by the U.S. House last year but has been obstructed in the Senate by Republicans and right-wing Democrats including Sens. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.), who oppose eliminating the filibuster in order to pass a Democratic agenda.

The WHPA would codify the right to obtain and provide abortion care into federal law. As Common Dreams reported Monday, Republican senators are currently developing their own strategy to pass legislation regarding the right to an abortion; theirs would ban all abortion across the country after six weeks of pregnancy.

"They have been out there plotting, carefully cultivating the Supreme Court justices so they could have a majority on the bench who would accomplish something that the majority of Americans do not want," Warren told reporters after her speech.

Warren's call for federal lawmakers to "change all of this" contrasted with the comments made by other top Democrats on the steps of the U.S. Capitol Tuesday.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) announced the Senate would soon vote on codifying the right to abortion care into law, but did not comment on pressuring Sinema and Manchin to drop their opposition to killing the filibuster rule so the legislation can be passed.

"Every senator, now under the real glare of Roe v. Wade being repealed by the courts, is going to have to show which side they're on," Schumer told reporters.

President Joe Biden did not push for filibuster reform when asked whether it was needed to codify Roe, saying he was "not prepared to make those judgements now."

"I am angry and upset and determined," said Warren to a reporter. "The United States Congress can keep Roe v. Wade the law of the land, they just need to do it."