Trump-loving Republicans snatch up 'magacoins' -- and quickly fall victim to data breach
Drew Angerer, Getty Images, AFP | US President Donald Trump tosses a hat into the crowd as he arrives for a 'Make America Great Again' campaign rally in Montoursville, Pennsylvania, on May 20, 2019

More than 1,000 people -- including Republican leaders and conservative media personalities -- have already signed up for the pro-Donald Trump cryptocurrency magacoin.

Poor security on a website associated with the cryptocurrency exposed users' personal information, including passwords and IP addresses, and revealed that the vast majority of the magacoin produced has gone to its self-described creator Marc Zelinka, a Trump-loving consultant, and a Super PAC associated with him, reported The Guardian.

A self-described hacktivist shared the website's data with the newspaper, showing that most users have only 100 magacoins, but at least some of them have taken advantage of an offer of 1,000 free magacoins to certain radio hosts, media personalities, bloggers and grassroots groups who agree to promote the cryptocurrency.

Right-wing talk radio host John Rush holds 1,500 magacoins, according to the leaked data, and hosted Zelinka, whose Colorado-based used car company Carmart Inc. applied for a trademark for the currency and administers a Facebook page for it.

Zelinka, however, insists he no longer controls magacoin and had handed off the cryptocurrency project to pro-Trump political operative Reilly O'Neal, who appears to control Super PACs funded in part by the cryptocurrency intended to support "MAGA candidates" around the country.

A 10-million magacoin gift from an email address associated with O'Neal's political consulting firm Tidewater Strategies was made to the Magacoin Victory Fund that appears to be controlled by the North Carolina-based GOP operative, while another 2 million magacoins came from an account that appears to be controlled by Zelinka.

O'Neal has worked on the losing campaign for accused pedophile judge Roy Moore, and he reportedly has a stake in the right-wing conspiracy website Big League Politics.

His Tidewater Strategies was paid by pro-Trump Republican candidates in the last election cycle, but most of them lost.