Evangelical figures sour on Trump: 'He can't even save himself'
Donald Trump speaking with attendees at the "Rally to Protect Our Elections" hosted by Turning Point Action. (Gage Skidmore/Flickr)

On Monday, The Daily Beast reported that key evangelical leaders are beginning to sour on former President Donald Trump, believing he lacks what it takes to help them win their cultural fight for America.

"Even in the wake of Roe v. Wade being overturned — thanks to conservative judges Donald Trump appointed — top evangelical leaders are distancing themselves from the former president, fearing he might not have what it takes to win in 2024 and growing tired of his persistent scandals and controversies, according to Semafor," reported Asta Hemenway.

"Evangelical leaders like Bob Vander Plaats, president and CEO of the Family Leader, told Semafor other conservatives he’s spoken with like Trump but hope to move forward with 'a vision for the future versus a complaint or critique about the past,'" said the report. Meanwhile, Tony Perkins, the longtime pro-Trump leader of the anti-LGBTQ hate group Family Research Council, said that evangelicals "don't want a lot of drama" and are tired of Trump's constant complaints the 2020 presidential election was stolen.

These recent breaks from Trump come after a searing criticism of the former president by Texas-based Christian Zionist Mike Evans, who stated, “Donald Trump can’t save America. He can’t even save himself. He used us to win the White House. We had to close our mouths and eyes when he said things that horrified us. I cannot do that anymore.”

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Evangelical voters have long been one of Trump's most reliable voting blocs. Indeed, they were so devoted to Trump that there is evidence they changed entire parts of their worldview for the sake of showing loyalty to him; polls during the Trump years showed that evangelicals did a complete 180 on the question of whether a person immoral in their private life could be a moral leader, going from 60 percent No to 80 percent Yes.

Recently, however, doubts have been growing in some corners of the evangelical community. The movement appears to be shifting the foundations of evangelical politics, with some evangelical voters — particularly those of color — abandoning the right.