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Santa Clara cops threaten to boycott Kaepernick games over ‘harassing behavior’

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The union representing Santa Clara police threatened on Friday to boycott San Francisco 49ers games because of Colin Kaepernick’s protest against police brutality, KNTV-TV reported.

“The board of directors of the Santa Clara Police Officer’s Association has a duty to protect its members and work to make all of their workings environments free of harassing behavior,” the group said in a letter to the team, which plays its home games in that city.

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If the team does not take action against the quarterback, the letter stated, “It could result in police officers choosing not to work at your facilities.”

Earlier this week, the San Francisco Police Officers Association demanded apologies from both the team and the National Football League over what they called Kaepernick’s “total lack of sensitivity” regarding their job performance, and also challenged the quarterback to train with their police academy for a day, an offer Kaepernick said on Thursday he was considering.

However, Kaepernick also took note of the findings regarding San Francisco officers’ tendency to send one another racist text messages. A panel of three judges also determined that the department showed “institutionalized bias” against communities of color.

“The SFPD has had a lot of issues,” Kaepernick said on Thursday, adding that the officers in question were “not only talking about the community, but talking about colleagues that work in the same department.”

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Devin Nunes’ income called into question as watchdog asks for investigation of his finances

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According to a report from the Fresno Bee,the non-partisan Campaign Legal Center is requesting a federal investigation into whether U.S. Representative Devin Nunes (R-CA) is receiving legal services in violation of House ethics rules.

Over the past year, the conservative Republicans has launched a handful of lawsuits against critics -- including the McClatchy newspaper chain and a person on Twitter purporting to be one of his cows.

According to the Bee, "The complaint says Nunes appears to be in 'blatant violation of House rules,' because he would have trouble paying for all these lawsuits solely from his congressional salary of $174,000 per year. The group argues he’d only be able to pay if he received legal services for free, at a discounted rate, or based on a contingency fee, meaning the lawyer would get compensated from Nunes’ winnings if he prevails in his lawsuits."

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2020 Election

$1,750+ ticket prices for South Carolina debate spark outrage

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"I think it speaks to the fundamental, endemic corruption of the Democratic Party establishment that you had to pay... multiple thousands of dollars to get into that room."

Unusually loud booing and jeering directed disproportionately at Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren during Tuesday night's Democratic presidential debate—particularly when the senators criticized billionaire businessman Michael Bloomberg—sparked probing questions about the class composition of the audience packed inside the Gaillard Center in Charleston, South Carolina.

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Ex-GOP senator hammers lawmakers quaking in their boots out of fear of Trump: ‘Why are you there?’

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Appearing on CNN on Wednesday morning, retired Sen. William Cohen (R-ME) hammered members of his own party still sitting in the Senate who refuse to take on Donald Trump, saying they are failing the country and themselves by standing by in fear.

Speaking with CNN hosts Poppy Harlow and Jim Sciutto, Cohen said kowtowing to the president is nothing new, but has grown worse over the past ten years.

"Some of it has to do with external pressures, that of social media, talk radio, specific channels that have a particular view and then hammer that view home to the constituents who then pressure the members of Congress," he explained. "But you have to ask yourself: Why are you a senator? Why are you there? Are you acting out of sheer fear that if you speak up and take a position that's controversial you'll be punished?"

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