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Iowa farmer tells Trump he can’t take much more of this trade war

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President Donald Trump heads to Iowa a little less than two years before the election. Given the frustration among the agricultural community, however, a visit to hear their concerns may be needed.

The Wall Street Journal interviewed an Iowa farmer about Trump’s trade war that has gone on for over a year and sent waves of economic anxiety through middle-America.

“I can stand a little bit of short-term pain to get a better market for the future,” said Dave Walton, an Iowa farmer and Trump voter. “But we’re at the point now that the pain has turned to bleeding.”

The trade war in combination with a series of natural disasters is putting farmers between a rock and a hard place. Recent promises from Trump to bail out farmers if China won’t buy their crop is certainly a help for the bottom line, but if that crop then gets destroyed in the torrential rains that have plagued Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas, farmers are left unsure of what to do.

Iowa is typically seen as a red state, but the president is having trouble, with approval of just 42 percent in the state, according to a Morning Consult poll. Despite the poor show in polls, Trump reportedly told his staff to lie to the media about where his poll numbers stood, The New York Times reported.

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“After being briefed on a devastating 17-state poll conducted by his campaign pollster, Tony Fabrizio, Mr. Trump told aides to deny that his internal polling showed him trailing Mr. Biden in many of the states he needs to win, even though he is also trailing in public polls from key states like Texas, Michigan and Pennsylvania,” the newspaper said.

It may be why Trump raged at his staff, telling them to get him to the trail, long before a president typically launches a reelection campaign.

“Trump has griped about traveling too much, but then lashed out at aides, demanding to know, ‘Why am I not doing more rallies?’” the Times reported.

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Trump has an 81 percent approval rating from registered Republicans in Iowa, according to a March poll. However, it’s below the national average, which puts Trump at a 90 percent approval among Republican voters.

“I don’t believe he realized on the tariffs how it would impact the economy,” said Marla Gentry of Indiana. She is among the voters searching for change in 2020.

Trump will speak in Iowa Tuesday evening, just moments after former Vice President Joe Biden takes the stage on the east side of the state.

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“Iowa farmers have been crushed by his tariff war with China and no one knows better than the folks in Iowa. He thinks that being tough is great, well it’s really easy to be tough when someone else absorbs the pain: farmers, manufacturers, the automobile industry,” Biden said in a speech Tuesday.

Biden’s comments sparked a rage in the president.

Trump speaks at an Iowa Republican Party dinner at 6:30 p.m. CDT.


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Former Fox & Friends co-host Clayton Morris flees the US as he faces two dozen lawsuits

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Facing more than two-dozen lawsuits alleging he committed real estate fraud, former "Fox & Friends Weekend" co-host Clayton Morris has reportedly fled the United States, according to the Indianapolis Star.

Morris, who previously resided in a $1.4 million home in New Jersey, moved his family to a coastal resort town in Portugal, the newspaper reported, citing a Facebook post from his wife.

Morris's wife and business partner, former MSNBC anchor Natali Morris, told the IndyStar that she and her husband plan to continue fighting the lawsuits from abroad.

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Trump defenders argued his latest tweets weren’t really racist — but he just completely undercut their arguments

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Donald Trump in coal helmet thumbs up

If you try to defend President Donald Trump, you will always end up having the rug pulled out from underneath you. It's a law of nature.

And yet, so many of the president's allies have failed to learn this simple lesson. So when Trump launched a new attack at progressive Democratic lawmakers that was one of his most obviously racist smears, inevitably, some of his defenders tried to deny the obvious truth.

His screed attacked a group of women who have come to define the left wing of the Democratic caucus, which includes Reps. Ilhan Omar (MN), Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (NY), Rashida Talib (MI), and Ayanna Pressley (MA). Though only Omar is an immigrant (she was a refugee from Somalia as a child), Trump seemed to assume all four women of color weren't born in the United States, and most egregiously, he suggested they should "go back" to other countries:

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Trump is facing massive criticism for his attacks on young women of color in Congress

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US President Donald Trump came under fire from Democrats and even some members of his own Republican Party on Monday after launching an extraordinary xenophobic attack on four progressive Democratic congresswomen.

"All they do is complain," Trump told reporters at a White House event featuring products "Made in America."

"These are people that hate our country," he said of the four lawmakers. "If you're not happy here, you can leave."

Trump also accused the four first-term congresswomen -- who are of Hispanic, Arab, Somali and African American origin -- of having "love" for US "enemies like Al-Qaeda."

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