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Lev Parnas’ lawyer ties Lindsey Graham to corrupt Ukraine scheme

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Rudy Giuliani delivered a letter in late 2018 to Sen. Lindsey Graham calling for sanctions on Ukrainian government officials, including a corruption reformer and another who ran the company whose board Hunter Biden served on.

The attorney for indicted Giuliani henchman Lev Parnas showed the letter to The Daily Beast, which reported the document described the Ukrainian politicians and business leaders as an “organized crime syndicate” — and misspelled the GOP senator’s name as “Lingsey.”

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Attorney Joseph Bondy told the website that Giuliani also showed Parnas a similar letter sent to Sigal Mandelker, then a top official at the U.S. Treasury Department, which enforces foreign sanctions.

“It concerns me, as should any fellow American, that a taxpayer’s money is rudely been stolen in Ukraine [sic],” that letter reads.

The writer of the Mandelker letter identifies himself as Michael Guralnik, a Ukraine-born U.S. citizen who graduated from the Soviet Military Academy and supposedly served 10 years in the Soviet army, but the letter to Graham is signed by Guralnik but doesn’t include the introduction.

The letter arrived a month before Giuliani tried to help former Ukrainian top prosecutor Viktor Shokin travel to the U.S. for a meeting with Graham, according to Bondy.

Several weeks earlier, President Donald Trump’s attorney sent a letter of his own to Graham asking his staff to help three unnamed Ukrainians obtain visas to visit the U.S. and share information about the Bidens.

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Graham and Giuliani did not respond to The Daily Beast’s requests for comment, and it’s not clear whether any lawmakers considered the sanctions recommended by Guralnik — who hung up on the reporters and later followed up by text: “Do not call any more.”


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Judge blocking release of Jeffrey Epstein records has ties to officials linked to Epstein: report

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On Saturday, the Miami Herald reported that a judge who blocked the release of grand jury material in the Jeffrey Epstein child sex abuse case has ties to three officials with a vested interest in the outcome of the lawsuits surrounding the scandal.

"Krista Marx, the Palm Beach chief judge who also heads a panel that polices judicial conduct, has potential conflicts of interest involving three prominent players embroiled in the Epstein sex-trafficking saga: State Attorney Dave Aronberg, who has been sued by the Palm Beach Post to release the grand jury records; Sheriff Ric Bradshaw, whose department’s favored treatment of Epstein while he was in the Palm Beach County jail is part of an ongoing state criminal investigation; and ex-State Attorney Barry Krischer, part of the same investigation in connection with his decision not to prosecute Epstein on child-sex charges," wrote Julie Brown, a reporter who has extensively covered the Epstein case.

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WATCH: Buffalo cops and firefighters cheer officers charged with assault as they leave the courthouse

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According to a report from both CNN and MSNBC, the two Buffalo police officers who were charged with second-degree assault after shoving a 75-year-old anti-police brutality protester to the ground where he sustained head injuries were greeted with applause after they were arraigned on Saturday morning.

MSNBC's Alex Witt noted that both officers were released without having to post bail.

According to ABC News, "Officers Aaron Torglaski and Robert McCabe were charged with second-degree assault during their video arraignments on Saturday and were released on their own recognizance. They both entered no guilty pleas and are expected back in court on July 20."

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Can it happen here? Bill Moyers says it’s happening right before our very eyes

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At 98, historian Bernard Weisberger has seen it all. Born in 1922, he grew up watching newsreels of Benito Mussolini and Adolf Hitler as they rose to power in Europe. He vividly remembers Mussolini posturing to crowds from his balcony in Rome, chin outthrust, right arm extended. Nor has he forgotten Der Fuehrer’s raspy voice on radio, interrupted by cheers of “Heil Hitler,” full of menace even without pictures.

Fascist bullies and threats anger Bernie, and when America went to war to confront them, he interrupted his study of history to help make history by joining the army. He yearned to be an aviator but his eyesight was too poor. So he took a special course in Japanese at Columbia University and was sent as a translator to the China-Burma-India theater where Japanese warlords were out to conquer Asia. Bernie remembers them, too.

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