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‘Abuse towards women’ is a ‘feature’ of being in Trump’s inner circle: columnist

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Fort Lauderdale Police Department bodycam footage of Brad Parscale. (screengrab).

Candice Parscale, the wife of former Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale, alleged over the weekend that he had physically abused her shortly before he barricaded himself in a room armed with multiple guns and threatened to hurt himself.

Although Parscale has since walked back the allegations of abuse, she is far from the only woman who has in the past alleged abuse by a member of President Donald Trump’s inner circle.

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As Daily Beast columnist Molly Jong-Fast documents, former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, former White House aide Rob Porter, and current Trump campaign adviser Jason Miller have all been accused of abusing women in one form or another.

The case of Miller is particularly grotesque, writes Jong-Fast, because he was actually re-hired by the president even after particularly horrific allegations of abuse came to light.

“You’ll remember Jason Miller as the guy who impregnated A.J. Delgado during his own wife’s pregnancy and then told her she couldn’t be seen ‘waddling around the White House pregnant,'” she writes. “In a deposition, Miller also confessed to ‘other indiscretions,’ including visiting ‘Asian themed’ massage parlors… There are also allegations that Miller is hiding his income so that he doesn’t have to pay $3,167 a month in child support.”

All of this leads Jong-Fast to conclude that violence against women is just seen as the price of doing business with the president.

“The misogyny, the violence, the abuse toward women aren’t a bug in Trumpworld, they’re a feature,” she writes. “It’s not a coincidence that men keep abusing their wives in Trumpworld; it’s the brand, it’s the way they operate.”

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Joy Reid: What’s the point of having laws if the president’s friends can break them without consequence?

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The recent pardon of ret. Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn exasperated MSNBC's Joy Reid, who welcomed former federal prosecutors on her show Wednesday. She explained that President Donald Trump's opposition to "law and order" when it comes to his friends is just more example of Republican hypocrisy to which Americans have become accustomed.

"You know, and Congressman Lieu, you've got The Wall Street Journal going sort of deeper into some of the other things that he did," Reid said of Flynn. "This is not the guy we remember just chanting 'lock her up' at the 2016 Republican National Convention, which is what probably people know him for. Michael Flynn planned to forcibly kidnap a Muslim cleric living in the United States and deliver him to Turkey under the alleged proposal. Flynn and his son, Michael Flynn Jr. were to be paid as much as $15 million to deliver him to the Turkish government, basically renditioning him for cash. Yet you have Lindsey Graham still Lindsey Grahaming calling it 'a great use of the pardon.' A-OK. Great job, Donald. I wonder what you make of this. I'm old enough to remember when Bill Clinton did a pardon for which Republicans would love to see him clacked in leg irons at the end of his presidency!"

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‘Last chapter in The Godfather’: Watergate prosecutor tears into Trump’s ‘continuing coverup’ of his associates’ Russia misdeeds

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On CNN Wednesday, former Watergate assistant special prosecutor Nick Akerman tore into outgoing President Donald Trump for his pardon of ex-National Security Adviser Michael Flynn — and warned that a larger coverup is looming.

"I think you have to look at the big picture here," said Akerman. "The big picture is that this is part of the continuing coverup of Donald Trump's efforts to conceal what happened between his campaign in 2016 with the Russian government. It started with Jim Comey, his firing because he refused to basically give an oath of loyalty to Donald Trump. It continued when Robert Mueller was appointed, the continuing threats of firing Mueller and his staff. It continued with Roger Stone, who was — his sentence was commuted."

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Conservative Charlie Sykes tells Trump if he wants a pardon — he’ll have to admit he’s guilty first

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Editor and creator of The Bulwark, Charlie Sykes, told MSNBC's Joy Reid that the most "Trumpy" of things President Donald Trump could do is pardon himself ahead of leaving office in January.

After the president pardoned ret. Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, it sparked new anticipation on how Trump will protect himself from prosecution after leaving office. Trump was alleged to have committed at least ten acts of obstruction of justice by special counsel Robert Mueller. In that case, the Justice Department followed the internal rule that sitting presidents could not be indicted. Then, it stands to reason that the Justice Department would also follow a 1974 memo from the same Office of Legal Counsel that said a president could not pardon himself.

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