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Trump ‘exploring ways to make money for relatively little work’ after leaving the White House: report

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Donald Trump on Instagram (Screenshot)

President Donald Trump’s work ethic was on display again on Saturday when he skipped a global pandemic response meeting to play golf.

The dereliction earned him the nickname “First Golfer” from the White House pool reporter on duty.

Trump apparently wants to keep up his carefree lifestyle after leaving the White House, according to a new report by The Washington Post.

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“In a nod to the reality that he is destined to leave office in January, the president is seriously contemplating life beyond the White House, telling advisers that he wants to remain an omnipresent force in politics and the media — perhaps by running for the White House again,” the newspaper reported Saturday.

“Trump has told confidants that he could announce a 2024 campaign before the end of this year, which would immediately set up a potential rematch with President-elect Joe Biden. Trump also has been exploring ways to make money for relatively little work, such as giving paid speeches to corporate groups or selling tickets to rallies. In addition, he may try to write a score-settling memoir of his time as president and appear on television, in a paid or unpaid capacity,” The Post explained.

Trump’s efforts to do “relatively little work” may foil his plans to start a new television network.

“Though there has also been considerable chatter among Trump’s associates about him starting a media company of his own, many close to the president said they believe that option is less likely, in part because it would be an arduous undertaking without guaranteed success,” the newspaper explained. “These advisers, like some others interviewed for this story, spoke on the condition of anonymity to candidly discuss sensitive topics.”

Regardless, Trump needs to make money.

“There is also pressure on Trump to monetize his post-presidency in light of his personal debt and legal troubles. He has payments due over the next four years for more than $400 million in loans and could incur substantial legal fees related to a bevy of investigations and lawsuits,” the newspaper reported.

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2020 Election

Trump abruptly ends news conference after 1 minute as reporters grill him on conceding

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President Donald Trump took one minute out of his day on Thursday to hold a press conference in which he took credit for gains in the stock market, which came after President-elect Joe Biden's transition was allowed to formally begin.

At his press conference which lasted almost exactly one minute, Trump credited his administration for after the Dow Jones Industrial Average traded above 30,000 for the first time.

"The stock market, it's just broken 30,000," the president said. "Never broken that number. That's a sacred number. Nobody thought they would ever see it. That's the ninth time since the beginning of 2020 and it's the 48th time that we have broken records in -- during the Trump administration."

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2020 Election

Here’s the best way to pry Trump from the White House — according to a professional hostage negotiator

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President Donald Trump is still refusing the concede that he lost the 2020 presidential election, which has prompted some speculation over whether the Secret Service will be forced to drag him out of the White House on January 20th.

In an interview with the Boston Globe, retired NYPD homicide detective Alfred S. Titus, Jr. said that the best way to coax Trump to leave would be to remind him of how great his life was before he decided to run for office back in 2015.

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2020 Election

Trump-loving congressman turns himself into a laughingstock with a few deranged tweets

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The first thing you should know about Rep. Paul Gosar of Arizona is that he shouldn’t be confused with the famous movie villain from “Ghostbusters.”

One of them has been described as a “sadistic, shapeshifting, apocalyptic, cosmic entity.”

The other spelled his name differently and wasn’t a registered Republican.

Paul Gosar is no relation of Gozer the Gozerian. But he’s doing his best movie-villain schtick as part of a cottage industry of loyal subjects vying to carry on the manic mantle of Trumpism.

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