Feud erupts among House Republicans as Freedom Caucus seeks to obstruct legislation
Congressman Andy Biggs speaking with supporters of President of the United States Donald Trump at a "Keep America Great" rally. (Gage Skidmore/Flickr)

On Wednesday, POLITICO reported that an argument broke out on the floor of the House between two key Republican lawmakers over how much the GOP caucus should abuse legislative procedure to slow down the passage of noncontroversial bills.

"Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Ala.), the top Republican on the House Armed Services Committee and a self-described Freedom Caucus critic, confronted certain members, including the group's chair, Rep. Scott Perry (R-Pa.), warning them that they were burning bridges with their own colleagues, according to a Republican source familiar with the back-and-forth," reported Olivia Beavers. "Rogers suggested if they keep causing headaches with their colleagues, it will come back to bite Freedom Caucus members later on."

At issue is the use of a specific procedure to allow quick passage of bills with overwhelming support. Far-right Republicans want leadership to abandon decorum and stop the use of this procedure.

"Reps. Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.), the former Freedom Caucus chair, and Chip Roy (R-Texas) joined Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) on his podcast this week to discuss how they have hamstrung the House's ability to quickly pass popular bills. Essentially, certain Republicans have stopped allowing Democrats to quickly pass noncontroversial legislation by voice vote, making them take recorded votes on nearly every bill," said the report. "Biggs and Roy knocked leadership and their colleagues for allowing voice votes — a generally accepted practice that saves members hours on passing legislation. Their pushback on voice votes has even split members within the Freedom Caucus, with some opposing their colleagues’ frequent push for recorded votes."

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"Biggs recalled a Republican member getting 'in my face last night,' telling him he had better things to do than spend hours more voting on a bill that was expected to pass with ease," the report continued.

This comes as Biggs and Perry are among a handful of Republicans subpoenaed by the House Select Committee over their roles in the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol.