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High-profile militant Jon Ritzheimer flees home to Arizona hours before feds spring trap

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One of the most prominent Oregon militants fled home before his comrades were shot, arrested or scattered during an apparent ambush by law enforcement officers.

Jon Ritzheimer, a U.S. Marine Corps veteran who has gained a high profile for his anti-Muslim rallies and threats against government officials, shared a series of Facebook posts that indicated he’d left the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge and returned home.

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“FYI. I came home to AZ to visit my family,” Ritzheimer posted late Tuesday. “The feds know I am here and are charging me with Conspiracy to impede a federal officer. I need an attorney. My family needs help and I am hoping they grant me bail.”

That’s the same charge that law enforcement officers have lodged against seven other militants, including Ammon Bundy, Ryan Bundy and Ryan Payne.

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The FBI issued a statement early Wednesday saying the 32-year-old Ritzheimer had turned himself in and was arrested without incident.

“Ritzheimer faces one federal felony charge of conspiracy to impede officers of the United States from discharging their official duties through the use of force, intimidation, or threats, in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 372,” the FBI said in a statement.

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The militant also shared a video of his reunion with his two young daughters, but he warned them “daddy has to go away for awhile.”

“I came home to visit my family,” Ritzheimer said in a comment on the Facebook video. “The Feds know I am here and are asking me to turn myself in. I need an attorney so I can get back to my girls. Please help my family. Donations can be made at www.rogueinfidel.com to help with legal fees. Thank you all in advance. I just want the country to live by the Constitution and I just want the government to abide by it.”

Ritzheimer’s close friend, Blaine Cooper, apparently vowed to a talk radio host close to the militants — Pete Santilli — that he would not be taken alive.

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That alarmed Santilli — who pointed out that women and children were at the wildlife refuge.


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Mitch McConnell’s impeachment rules pass by 53-47 vote — here’s what happens next in Trump’s senate trial

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The US Senate voted along party lines on Tuesday to set the rules for President Donald Trump's historic impeachment trial.

By a 53 to 47 vote, the Republican-controlled Senate approved an "organizing resolution" for the trial proposed by Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Before approving the rules, the Senate voted down several amendments proposed by Democrats seeking to subpoena witnesses and documents from the White House and State Department.

These are the next phases in Trump's impeachment trial, just the third of a president in US history:

- Opening arguments -

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Chief Justice Roberts admonishes lawyers at Senate impeachment trial

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Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court John Roberts made his first major intervention in President Donald Trump's impeachment trial shortly before 1 a.m. Wednesday morning.

After House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-CA) finished his closing arguments on why former National Security Advisor John Bolton should testify, the White House team went on the attack. Yelling and demanding apologies, the president's team was more animated than they'd been all night. Roberts then admonished the House and White House on their language.

Claiming the Senate is the "world's greatest deliberative body" -- despite what he had witnessed during 12 hours of the impeachment trial -- Roberts complained about language that was "not conducive to civil discourse."

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White House lawyers begin yelling at Democrats during late-night impeachment trial — after Trump starts tweeting

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President Donald Trump woke up and began tweeting around midnight EST during the Senate impeachment trial over the amendments over the rules. That's when a noticeable thing changed on the Senate floor: Trump's team started yelling.

Nearing 1 a.m. EST Tuesday morning while the president was tweeting about impeachment, his team began attacking Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY) personally. They called him a liar and accused him of attacking the president and demanded an apology. After nearly 12 hours this was the first time the White House got even remotely animated after a dull defense of the president.

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