President Donald Trump began his Pensacola, Florida political rally, touting "his" success of the economy and trade. His speech was expected to target potential voters for Alabama Republican Roy Moore -- but he barely mentioned Moore's name in remarks that lasted over an hour.


Trump made a back-handed comment about the Moore accusers, some of whom are represented by Gloria Allred. He blasted her, claiming, "every time you see her you know something is going on."

Rather than focusing on Moore, Trump chose to denounce Democratic opponent Doug Jones, who the president said would be a puppet for Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY). Trump, whose party holds an overwhelming majority in the House and a smaller majority in the Senate said that he needed more Republicans in office who will support his policies.

Moore, however, has spent a lot of time attacking Trump for supporting another candidate in the race. At the end of the tirade, Trump said simply, "Vote for Roy Moore."

Trump endorsed Moore, despite the members of his own party, who have denounced the former judge. The Republican National Committee has given $170,000 to help elect Moore, in wake of Trump's endorsement.

Trump claimed that pensions are growing, despite public employee pension systems being cut in states all over the country. At one point, Trump asked the city, if they had heard about the hurricane that hit the area only a few months before.

The RNC and Trump's team set a rally outside of Alabama in Pensacola, Florida, prior to Trump's decision to endorse Moore. The area shares a media market with southern Alabama that targets 1 in 6 citizens.

He harkened back to claims that he "won the election in a landslide," when in fact he lost the popular vote. When he mentioned former Sec. Hillary Clinton the crowd broke into chants of "lock her up." Trump proceeded to blame a "rigged system."

He blasted the Paris climate agreement saying that by pulling out he could come back in "at a better price" as if it was a real estate deal. He told the audience, "I want clean air. I want crystal clear clean water" and followed it by touting coal plants. He blasted wind energy as unreliable saying, "well, when the wind doesn't blow we have no energy."

Energy experts explain the scientifically accurate data and forecasts help grid operations to be more equipped to "balance diverse resources and can adjust as needed."

He turned to blast immigration policies that he claimed killed Kate Steinle. He called the acquittal "a total miscarriage of justice." He noted drugs and criminals coming over the border and overstaying their visas. He attacked "chain migration" and cited a man who ran over people running along the highway. Trump claimed that the man could have been responsible for bringing in 24 other people through chain migration. There's no way to substantiate any of what Trump asserted.

When addressing crime, Trump turned to attack Chicago, saying that there are places in Afghanistan that are safer. He specifically blamed the "politicians." Chicago has a lower crime rate per-capita than other cities like Albuquerque, New Mexico, Beaumont, Texas, Buffalo, New York and more.

In a small divergence from the topic, Trump touted his success in bringing back "Merry Christmas," saying stories are using the words again. He then pivoted back to immigration, saying, "we will not let these people back in."

Moore has seen a slight slump in his poll numbers since multiple women have come forward saying he preyed on them as teens. More evidence surfaced that Moore was monitored at a local mall and Moore's own words came back to haunt him, when it was discovered he met his wife as a teen.

Trump said Moore's name a grand total of two times and only referred to the GOP candidate. The name-drop was sandwiched between touting his "success" and a meandering rant about foreign policy.

He nearly ended the speech celebrating the idea that everyone worships God, salutes the flag and celebrates the "Star Spangled Banner." However, he diverted back to the 2016 election, his landslide win and attacked Clinton several more times. Specifically, he noted the moment Clinton called some of Trump's supporters "deplorables."

"I said, huh, that's not nice," he said, despite his well-documented history of bullying. "Now we're all proud deplorables."

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