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The alt-right tried to make their own Internet after being banned from social media — and failed miserably

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After being banned from sites like Twitter, Facebook, GoFundMe and YouTube, alt-righters quested to create their own version of the Internet — but their “alt-tech” sites might not be a great as they’d hoped.

As The New York TimesKevin Roose reports, even the alt-right’s flagship sites, like Gab (their Pepe-themed social network modeled after Twitter) and Hatreon have “long load times, broken links and frequent error messages.”

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Gab was billed as an alt-tech success after raising $1 million via crowdfunding and subsequent claims of 300,000 active users (including Milo Yiannopoulos and The Daily Stormer’s Andrew Anglin), but as Roose discovered, the site is now “buggy and confusing. It appears to have fallen the way of Ello, the short-lived social network that debuted in 2014 to ample fanfare but died shortly thereafter, with only a small core of dedicated users making up its’ activity.

“I’m a creature of habit, and fell out of habit of posting there,” Pizzagate provocateur Mike Cernovich told Roose.

Hatreon, too, burst onto the scene as the alt-right’s response to GoFundMe after the popular crowdfunding site kicked users off en masse for being bigots. Despite boasting campaigns for figures like Richard Spencer (who advertises his on his newly-unverified Twitter profile), Hatreon currently is not accepting pledges because, as company founder Cody Wilson told Roose, a major credit card company “kicked Hatreon off its network last month, preventing many users from funding projects on the site and all but killing the company’s prospects for growth.”

Wilson also told Roose that he doesn’t identify as alt-right, and that building ideology-based alternatives to such giants as Facebook and Twitter might be a fool’s errand.

“I don’t understand how any of them plan to be profitable,” the Hatreon developer said.

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There are countless such alt-tech sites, many of whom haven’t received even a fraction of the buzz Hatreon or Gab have.

“There is WrongThink (alt-Facebook), PewTube (alt-YouTube), Voat (alt-Reddit), Infogalactic (alt-Wikipedia) and GoyFundMe (alt-Kickstarter),” Roose notes. “There is even WASP.love, a dating site for white nationalists and others ‘wishing to preserve their heritage.'”

The writer acknowledges that it may be too soon in the Trump-fueled alt-right network craze, and that many of their proponents “are hopeful that a coming ‘purge’ on Twitter — their phrase for a change in the site’s hate speech policies, which Twitter plans to enforce beginning next week — will send scores of disgruntled users scurrying to alt-tech platforms.”

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Shortly after Roose’s unflattering feature was published in the Times, Gab took to Twitter, a social network they were built in part to offer a “censorship-free” escape from, to insult Roose.

https://twitter.com/getongab/status/940371120284405760

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Cars set on fire blocks from White House as DC protests turn violent

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The Washington, D.C. protests turned violent as the city approached the 11 p.m. curfew the mayor instituted Sunday afternoon.

The policy of D.C. police is that when they are attacked, they advance forward. So, when fireworks were fired, the line of officers began pushing the protesters back further from the White House. Behind the line of police officers also stand a line of National Guard troops that President Donald Trump has demanded stand watch in the city.

Lights that normally shine on the White House have also been turned off, reporters revealed.

https://twitter.com/markknoller/status/1267291138655956992

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Cincinnati sheriff deputies replace American flag at the Justice Center with ‘thin-blue-line’ flag

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Cincinnati police were filmed replacing the American flag that hangs over the Justice Center in Ohio's third-largest city. They then replaced it with the thin-blue-line flag, that was created to advocate for law-enforcement during Black Lives Matter Protests.

During the Charlottesville, Virginia riots, right-wing and white supremacist activists carried the thin-blue-line flag along with the Confederate flag to speak out against Black Lives Matter.

While the flag may have been created in support of law enforcement, it has been adopted by white supremacists and taken on a darker meaning.

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WATCH: DC protesters turn over ‘agitator’ to police — then the agitators try to start a fight with cops

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Protesters in Washington, D.C. were captured on video handing over an agitator to police, while other agitators in paintball tactical gear appeared to try and start fights with police.

Former FBI assistant director of counterintelligence, Frank Figliuzzi, revealed that his former colleagues and law enforcement he knows recognize that far-right agitators are attempting to start significant conflicts between police and protesters.

"There is a minimal presence of Antifa, but a far more disturbing presence of right-wing race-based hate groups, such as the Boogaloo Boys who think there will be a race-based civil war coming," he said on MSNBC.

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