Judge greenlights lawsuit against Colorado Pro-Trump group accused of sending armed vigilantes door-to-door
Saleswoman knocking on a door (Shutterstock)

On Wednesday, Newsweek reported that a federal judge is allowing a lawsuit from three Colorado voting rights organizations to proceed against another group, alleging it violated the post-Civil War Ku Klux Klan Act by engaging in organized intimidation of voters.

"U.S. District Judge Philip A. Brimmer late last month dismissed a motion from lawyers for U.S. Election Integrity Plan (USEIP) to dismiss the lawsuit brought against it by three voting rights groups," reported Jake Thomas. "The lawsuit alleges that USEIP's attempts to sniff out votes it believes were cast illegally ran afoul of federal voting rights protections. The legal battle is one of many playing out nationally following claims of widespread voter fraud in the 2020 election."

"The Colorado Montana Wyoming State Area Conference of the NAACP, the League of Women Voters of Colorado and Mi Familia Vota brought the lawsuit in March against USEIP, alleging the group violated the Voting Rights Act and the Ku Klux Klan Act," said the report. "Following the 2020 election, people affiliated with USEIP showed up on Colorado residents' doorsteps wearing badges and identified themselves with official-sounding groups, such as the "Voter Integrity Committee," according to the lawsuit."

The group, led by an ally of pro-Trump MyPillow CEO and election conspiracy theorist Mike Lindell, allegedly sent armed members door to door in the process of their "investigation."

The Ku Klux Klan Act, passed in 1871 with the intention of prohibiting activities commonly used at the time to terrorize freedmen, has also been used to try to go after former President Donald Trump for his scheme to overturn the 2020 presidential election outright.

Colorado, which voted for President Joe Biden by double digits, has seen pockets of far-right conspiracy theorists trying to prove Trump's "Big Lie" that the election was stolen. Two county clerks in the state have been accused of tampering with voting machines to try to find data supporting Trump's accusations.